Search Results: John Heminway


BOOK REVIEW

IN FULL FLIGHT by John Heminway
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 13, 2018

"A fascinating story in an occasionally frustrating recounting."
How does one weigh past evils against future good deeds? This is the central question of this at times compelling, at times vexing biographical sketch. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YONDER by John Heminway
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"Useful reading for city slickers contemplating a move to their own home on the range."
A graceful spirit-of-place study, set in territory widely thought to belong to God. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: June 20, 1968

John Heminway has traveled Africa since he was sixteen, here explores its recesses for the exotic transplants who came and stayed. They include Lathan Leslie-Moore, to whom civilization had ended in 1914 and who retreated to an island off Tanganyika, from which country he proceeded to secede; Sir Stewart Gore Browne who built a feudal estate in the wilds of North Rhodesia and has outlived its day; or, in the interior of Bechuanaland, Wilmot, crocodile hunter with thirty thousand notches on his gun; on the Luangwa, Uys, a game warden who has asked his body to be left in the bush for the hyenas and jackals, or Erica Crichley, who lends her style to the back country. Take tea with Trevor Huddleston at Masasi, a shot with lonides the snake man, or explore the idiosyncracies of the White Fathers and the nature of missionaries. In Kenya there are Sir Michael Blundell, the farmer, Tony Dyer, President of the East African Hunter's Association, the Adamsons. Heminway pictures Africa as picking up its many legs ""like some mythological monster,"" clumsily making its way to the edge of the abyss. But he has caught it: this is unusual (even when dealing with usual subjects such as the Adamsons), fresh, and like Africa, timeless a pleasure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STRANGE TRIBE by John Hemingway
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2007

"John's honesty is bracing as he tries hard for understanding and acceptance, but the Hemingway legacy remains as complicated as ever."
Desperately sad memoir by Ernest Hemingway's grandson chronicles a wretched family history of turbulent father-son relationships exacerbated by chronic, hereditary mental illness. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: Sept. 26, 1983

Modestly engaging first-hand portraits of a dozen white holdouts in black Africa—by the author of a similar, rather more vivid and timely gallery back in 1968, The Imminent Rains. First Heminway returns to a standout from the 1968 book: Latham Leslie-Moore, eccentric par excellence, who failed in the 1960s attempt to keep his privately-owned island separate from newly independent Tanganyika; here the grand old man, a close friend, is followed through his sad relocations around Africa, his temporary return to England, his health/romance problems. (After his death, Heminway learns that Latham was indeed Edward VII's bastard son—and ""I wept for an Africa that would soon forget the old man."") Another grand-old-man and personal friend is Harry Oppenheimer of South Africa's Anglo American Corporation: ""while shepherding a $10 million mining, metallurgical and industrial empire, 80 percent of whose assets lie in white supremacist South Africa, he goes on record as a foe of apartheid and a champion of multiracialism."" And there are other mostly-admiring views of: nononsense Anne Spoerry, ""underpaid, underthanked"" doctor to Kenya's tribal peoples; Dr. David Hopcraft, a rancher/ecologist fighting the desertification process that threatens Africa with vast mass starvation; wildlife filmmaker Alan Root, master of time-lapse photography and unusual angles; Gavin Lamont, the modest DeBeers geologist who unearthed Botswana's diamond mines after years of dogged perseverance; and several white hunters, all of whom have become more or less disillusioned. The only hatchet-job: Richard Leakey—who often dismissed his father Louis (""as you would someone close to you with a secret drinking problem""), who always has wanted to be a guru and ""mind bender,"" not just an explorer. And only one piece gives any substantial role to a black African: an intriguing double-portrait of the white warden of Kidepo Valley National Park and his black successor, with a fascinating piece of transcribed dialogue between them. Ranging in quality from routine to solidly informative or keenly evocative: an attractive group of closeups—but a very odd-angled, strangely unsatisfying view of today's Africa. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: May 1, 1977

Voluptuous outdoor feasts for diners with plenty of leisure to prepare in advance and the very best in backpacks and leakproof containers for transport. The picnics here are for every season, with some nice hot soups in a thermos for winter outings and chilled fruit soups for summer strolls. Also: homemade ice cream, deluxe patÉs, dips for fresh vegetables, and fancy pastries. The recipes are vaguely international, and decidedly rich. They are also, of course, ideal for home buffets, brunches, and even dinner parties for those who haven't the time to hike to a fresh mountain stream. Read full book review >

ARCHIVE

Released: May 20, 1974

Rosebud's not a flexible flyer but a yacht where five girls of assorted nationalities — one of them the daughter of just about the richest man in the world — are detained by the Black September kamikaze while demands are made to the world and their pleas along with films of their distress, in the buff, are circulated. So does everything else in a polyglut of flights, embassies, news agencies, foreign agents, political and moneyed interests and while the situation is catchy, you are not always sure that the authors (Miss Hemingway is Ernest's young granddaughter) know quite what to do with it beyond the principle of perpetual momentum. The general effect's quite like spending three days in a transit lounge but the tone is enthusiastic and they have a taste for ali kinds of highpowered referrals — acronyms, numbered accounts, and one man who must have eaten lots of hamburger helper to become a ""combination of Tarzan, James Bond, Mandrake the Magician and Zorro. Read full book review >