Search Results: "John McPhee"


BOOK REVIEW

PIECES OF THE FRAME by John McPhee
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: June 23, 1975

"Occasional reading—McPhee is one of the most unobtrusively instructive and pleasurable writers around."
As everyone knows, McPhee is a man of many parts and interests and this is an assortment of his casuals which take place here and there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 21, 1966

"A casual autocrat, he's a wonderful presence in print as he must be to all those who have known him."
From The New Yorker, this effortless portrait of Frank Learoyd Boyden, who came to Deerfield Academy in 1902 at the age of twenty-two and is still, in his own words, an "indestructible and infallible" figure, is full of life—a remarkable life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1974

"McPhee's warm portrayal of Taylor and his detailed assessment of current security practices will make your fears mushroom."
"I think we have to live with the expectation that once every four or five years a nuclear explosion will take place and kill a lot of people." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PINE BARRENS by John McPhee
NON-FICTION
Released: April 29, 1968

"All in all, enlivened facts, some well remembered events, and the customary pleasant softshoe styling."
This is one of John McPhee's extended profiles (The Headmaster, Oranges, etc.) guessably of New Yorker derivation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUNDING FISH by John McPhee
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"'I'm a shad fisherman,' says McPhee. True, but also a talented portraitist of the fish, a Gilbert Stuart of the species, and a William Hogarth, too, sticking an elbow into the ribs of his obsession."
A blue-chip tour of the American shad from McPhee (Annals of the Former World, 1998, etc.), maestro of the extended essay, if not the fly rod. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RISING FROM THE PLAINS by John McPhee
Released: Oct. 6, 1986

"A rather specialized topic, but one which is presented with style and, in the portrait of Love and his family, with affection and grace as well."
The third installment of McPhee's ongoing series, Annals of the Former World. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN SUSPECT TERRAIN by John McPhee
Released: March 1, 1983

"With Basin and Range (1981) and this latest excursion, McPhee has done the same thing, stylishly, for the general reader."
With his usual flair McPhee embodies the driving spirit of geology's language—"crunching scum," "orogeny," "kettles," "kames"—in a running biography of Anita Harris, a plain-talking, practical-minded geologist who learned her earth science at Brooklyn College. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMING INTO THE COUNTRY by John McPhee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 18, 1977

"Flecked with irony, written with rhythm and style—and more than the sum of its parts."
Alaska: the last frontier, a land of insulated stalwarts, climatic exigencies, and nineteen streams named Salmon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAFT NO. 4 by John McPhee
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"A superb book about doing his job by a master of his craft."
The renowned writer offers advice on information-gathering and nonfiction composition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOKING FOR A SHIP by John McPhee
Released: Sept. 1, 1990

"This classic sea story, previously published in The New Yorker, also asks why America responds in slow motion to global conditions."
McPhee embarks on a cargo ship to South America, scouting the endangered life of the American Merchant Marine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SURVIVAL OF THE BARK CANOE by John McPhee
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 9, 1975

"Another unique profile by a master craftsman."
McPhee is one of the few contemporary writers whose own enthusiasm, acquisitive curiosity and delight in the minor marvels evokes a similar reader response. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IRONS IN THE FIRE by John McPhee
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: April 1, 1997

"For old hands, more of the unique pleasures you have come to expect."
Nothing, it seems, is beyond McPhee's purview, and these seven essays (which first ran in the New Yorker) offer further evidence that in the right hands even the most prosaic of topics harbors an unsuspected richness of surprising facts and fancies. Read full book review >