Search Results: "John S. Barrett"


BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IN THE FLESH by Christa Wolf
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2005

"A murky and elliptical descent into darkness."
German writer from the former GDR, Wolf offers her latest intellectual-personal foray (Medea: A Modern Retelling, 1998, etc.): a somber, spare, sensitive treatment of pain, illness and memory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 14, 2004

"A story of hallucinatory grotesqueness told in an appalled voice that separates fact from rumor and grows rightfully angrier until the very bitter end. (8 pp. b&w photographs)"
A tale of foul and petty mistrust, nastiness, corruption, and careerism that led to a man's beheading and the incarceration of his charge, during the Nazi Nuremberg years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DUCK AND THE OWL by Hanna Johansen
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 30, 2005

"There's a resolution of sorts—'See you again soon,' says the owl, dozing into his much-needed day's sleep—but one doesn't hold out much hope for the relationship. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Two birds residing in the same meadow take a rather neurotic stab at friendship in this Swiss import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HENRIETTA AND THE GOLDEN EGGS by Hanna Johansen
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2003

"Better for one-on-one reading to give the pictures (and chickens) their due. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Henrietta is one of 3,333 chickens crowded together in a chicken house on a chicken farm in a space with just enough room for their feet; she is the only little one and the only one without a cough or loss of feathers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN by Niall Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Irish novelist Williams (Four Letters of Love, 1999, etc.) takes spiritual issues seriously—and continues to write compellingly about them."
John the Apostle, now a revered Master in exile with a small band of Christian brothers on the island of Patmos, confronts heresy, schism and doubt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S&M by Jeffrey DeShell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1997

STATEMENT PAGE Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. S by George Jacobs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2003

"Deliciously gossipy, yet Sinatra is recalled with affection rather than spite."
As-told-to memoir of life with the famous crooner by his African-American Man Friday, lubricated with racy tales about the stars, the Kennedys, and the Mob. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S/Z by Roland Barthes
Released: Sept. 9, 1974

"Barthes has brought new life to a foundering literary aesthetics with this synthesis of science and imaginative humanism, for those familiar with the terminology."
In this essential application of structural linguistics to the problems of literary criticism, Roland Barthes—a disciple of Saussure and one of the cardinal spokesmen of semiology—opposes both the goals and methods of classic rhetoric. Read full book review >