Search Results: "John S. Hutton"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 5, 2011

"Successfully mixes heavy-handed lessons on consumer awareness with tween-approved toilet jokes and just a smidge of romance."
In this middle-grade fantasy novel, an 11-year-old boy descends into a consumerist hell to save his parents, himself and the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK by John S. Hutton
by John S. Hutton, illustrated by Andrea Kang
Released: June 18, 2012

"Gentle, joyful encouragement for young readers and pre-readers to discover the rewards of a good book."
Hutton's charming little board book, the newest in a series, encourages young children to explore the pleasures of real books with real pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOGS! by John S. Hutton
by John S. Hutton, illustrated by Doug Cenko
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"While it's a playful and useful offering, readers will wish it were a bit bigger and higher contrast. (Board book. 2-4)"
A pack of playful dogs cavorts through the pages as little ones and their grown-ups are encouraged to engage through gentle prompts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ADH-ME! by John S. Hutton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"A potentially useful if undistinguished book about managing ADHD. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A pediatrician-penned story from the perspective of a child with ADHD. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN by Niall Williams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2008

"Irish novelist Williams (Four Letters of Love, 1999, etc.) takes spiritual issues seriously—and continues to write compellingly about them."
John the Apostle, now a revered Master in exile with a small band of Christian brothers on the island of Patmos, confronts heresy, schism and doubt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BALL by John Hutton
by John Hutton, illustrated by Sarah Jones
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"A sweet but not essential book. (Board book. 2-3)"
A whole host of children presents a whole host of balls in this new installment in the Baby Unplugged series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. S by George Jacobs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 3, 2003

"Deliciously gossipy, yet Sinatra is recalled with affection rather than spite."
As-told-to memoir of life with the famous crooner by his African-American Man Friday, lubricated with racy tales about the stars, the Kennedys, and the Mob. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S/Z by Roland Barthes
Released: Sept. 9, 1974

"Barthes has brought new life to a foundering literary aesthetics with this synthesis of science and imaginative humanism, for those familiar with the terminology."
In this essential application of structural linguistics to the problems of literary criticism, Roland Barthes—a disciple of Saussure and one of the cardinal spokesmen of semiology—opposes both the goals and methods of classic rhetoric. Read full book review >