Search Results: "John Seven"


BOOK REVIEW

FRANKIE LIKED TO SING by John Seven
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A remarkably successful lens into the life and career of one of the 20th century's formidable musical talents. (author's note, bibliography) (Picture book/biography. 5-9)"
A picture-book biography of that legendary Jersey boy, Frank Sinatra. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A YEAR WITH FRIENDS by John Seven
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2013

"This expressive childhood tribute to the joys of nature throughout the year warmly conveys the message that anytime is best when shared with a friend. (Picture book. 3-5)"
While lots of books about seasons are available, this one is as fresh and crisp as a cool fall breeze. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ALCHEMIST WAR by John Seven
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2013

"A flying start for a series that puts in a strong bid for Magic Treehouse grads. (Science fiction. 10-12)"
Two free-range 25th-century children get into and out of pickles while tagging along with their research-scientist parents to various past eras. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAPPY PUNKS 1 2 3 by John Seven
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 23, 2013

"Just the ticket for young punkers who sneer at counting, say, sheep. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A round dozen punk rockers assemble with friends for a dance party. Count along, and check out the stylish 'dos and duds! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASHES OF EDEN by Seven Everson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 24, 2015

"An original romance/mystery that will leave readers eagerly awaiting the next installment."
From debut novelist Everson, a supernatural story of first love and the realization that some things are not quite as they appear. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CICADA AND THE ANT by Jean de La Fontaine
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 2, 2013

"The insects are cute but not worth the price of admission: storytelling fail. (iPad storybook app. 3-6)"
The design and presentation of this familiar fable make it a sloppy, frustrating read. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROAD TRIPPIN’ IT WITH JOHN BURNINGHAM
by Julie Danielson

The holidays are nigh. I wrote this time last year about my favorite holiday picture book of all time – John Burningham’s Harvey Slumfenburger’s Christmas Present, originally published back in 1993.

I’m a big Burningham fan. (If you are, too, and you’ve not yet read this, run to your nearest bookstore or library.) And in thinking about Harvey, I was ...


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BLOG POST

JOHN NEWMAN
by Rhett Morgan

In 1992, John Newman prepared to celebrate finishing his Ph.D., securing a book deal with Warner Books for the release of his dissertation, JFK and Vietnam, and having worked directly with Oliver Stone as consultant on the film JFK. But a brief call from the National Security Agency put all of that in jeopardy. Newman was warned that his ...


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BLOG POST

JOHN T. EDGE
by Megan Labrise

John T. Edge’s The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South is no mere paean to peanuts, homage to hominy, and laudation to lard. Like the nutritive broth for which it’s named, this title is more substantive than it appears at a glance.

“One the primary aims of my book,” says Edge, a native Georgian who lives ...


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BOOK REVIEW

A CAT NAMED TIM AND OTHER STORIES by John Martz
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Visual learners and younger children alike will pore delightedly over these nearly wordless sequences. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Four whimsical cartoon outings feature an overlapping cast of small anthropomorphic animals artfully placed to lead eyes up, down, around and past page turns to mishaps and surprises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES OF BUNJITSU BUNNY by John Himmelman
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Nonviolence (mostly), the bunjitsu way. (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Martial arts high jinks with Bunjitsu Bunny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOOK...LOOK AGAIN! by John O'Brien
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"If the laughs come a tad unevenly, come they do: good, absurdist fun with sly, existential winks. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Renaissance guy O'Brien (who, in addition to penning New Yorker cartoons and illustrating prolifically for children, plays banjo and lifeguards in North Wildwood, N.J.) delivers wacky vignettes riffing on six professional tropes: farmer, chef, woodsman, knight, doorman and clown. Read full book review >