Search Results: "John Steptoe"


BOOK REVIEW

MARCIA by John Steptoe
Released: April 26, 1976

"And, whatever we adults make of its message, Marcia—with its modified black English, sassy dialogue, and underlying earnestness—is an issue book attuned to its intended audience."
The trouble with most of the new YA novels dealing with sex is that seventeen-year-old behavior, presuming seventeen-year-old feelings, is depicted in stories read chiefly by twelve-year-olds—and, in truth, written at their level. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEVIE by John Steptoe
Kirkus Star
illustrated by John Steptoe
Released: Sept. 1, 1969

"In a word, eloquent."
Easy does it: in his own loose, expressive idiom and a few trenchant paintings, a little black boy first resents and then regrets the loss of a younger boarder who was "kinda like a little brother." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY SPECIAL BEST WORDS by John Steptoe
Released: Sept. 1, 1974

"Of course Steptoe has always wielded a heavy hand with both his paints and, less impressively but just as boldly, his messages."
The special best words reported here are purportedly those of Steptoe's own family, as are the names of the two children, Javaka and his older sister Bweela who tell us that Daddy's best word is ILOVEYOU though he has others he says when he's mad wit' somebody. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UPTOWN by John Steptoe
Released: Oct. 7, 1970

"In the vitality, the resilience, the physical beauty — much surpassing Stevie — there's an affirmation that is also a denial of shame and ugliness and the book's validation for an adult; it doesn't coalesce (never mind the raw material) for anyone near picture book age and moreover it doesn't express the wanting they put in their poems, the truth they see in their photographs."
One thing you can say about Uptown, the place or the book, it's different. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUFARO'S BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTERS by Clarita Kohen
Released: March 31, 1987

"A beautiful book, deserving a permanent place in library collections."
Inspired by a Kafir folk tale published in an 1895 collection, Caldecott Honor winner Steptoe has reset the classic Cinderella pattern in an ancient Zimbabwe city. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BABY SAYS by ALC Staff
Released: April 20, 1988

"A wonderful vignette; a treasure to share."
From this year's Caldecott Honor winner: a warm, loving book for babies and toddlers about the interaction between a baby in a playpen and his older brother, who is playing with blocks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE STORY OF JUMPING MOUSE by John Steptoe
Released: March 1, 1984

"Think of it perhaps as a demonstration of art's transforming power, the weaknesses of the tale (and the telling) not-withstanding."
Whatever the authenticity of Steptoe's Plains Indian legend of a seeking, selfless mouse who turns into an eagle, his powerful, over-scale picturization is apt to evoke a response—at least the first time around. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JEFFREY BEAR CLEANS UP HIS ACT by John Steptoe
Released: April 28, 1983

"The sanitation-man is a bore, the teacher is a horror—and if the lesson's supposed to be that kids can't do better, it's not much of one."
The idea behind that slangy title is pretty crude too—but in an almost prissy way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRAIN RIDE by John Steptoe
Released: Sept. 1, 1971

"Even strangers to the city will want to go along."
The boys from Uptown visit "the city" in another of Steptoe's forcefully illustrated stories in the idiom of Harlem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DADDY IS A MONSTER...SOMETIMES by John Steptoe
Released: March 26, 1980

"So, though it's a weak vehicle for a lot of emotion, the authenticity of that emotion is not to be lightly dismissed."
"I'm probably a monster daddy," Bweela and her brother Javaka's daddy admits at the close, "when I got monster kids." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CREATIVITY by John Steptoe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 17, 1997

"Lewis's full-spread watercolors under a readable text happily complement this warm story of friendship. (Picture book. 6-10)"
A posthumously published story by Steptoe (Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters, 1987, etc.) demonstrates his usual themes of positive self-image and acceptance of cultural heritage, this time presenting young African-American Charles's reaction when "this new dude walks in" to Mr. Cohen's classroom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RADIANT CHILD by Javaka Steptoe
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 25, 2016

"Stellar bookmaking—a riveting portrait of a young artist. (author's note, bibliography, biography) (Picture book/biography. 6-12)"
Steptoe chronicles the formative years and evolving style of Jean-Michel Basquiat, a Brooklyn-born graffiti artist with a rising career in the 1980s fine arts world; coverage ceases before his untimely drug-related death at age 27. Read full book review >