Search Results: "John Twelve Hawks"


BOOK REVIEW

SPARK by John Twelve Hawks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"With its fascinating protagonist, Hawks' first book since his Forth Realm trilogy sets itself apart from other futuristic thrillers."
If you suffer from a condition that makes you think you're dead, robbing you of all human feeling, does that make you a better killer for hire? Hawks' latest dystopian adventure explores the possibilities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDEN CITY by John Twelve Hawks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 8, 2009

"Tepid and vague."
Less-than-rip-roaring final installment in Twelve Hawks' Fourth Realm trilogy (The Traveler, 2005, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRAVELER by John Twelve Hawks
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 28, 2005

"As if Carlos Castaneda and Robert Ludlum had collaborated for a surefire bestseller."
The first of a trilogy—and (it's hoped) the next Da Vinci Code. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DARK RIVER by John Twelve Hawks
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 10, 2007

"Dull."
The freedom-hating Vast Machine is at it again in this second libertarian-minded thriller from Twelve Hawks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLAYING THE MOLDOVANS AT TENNIS by Tony Hawks
NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2001

"Not particularly elevated or elevating, but a lot of fun."
Another goofy travelogue—and a UK bestseller—by the English writer who, on a dare, once hitchhiked around Ireland with a refrigerator. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WATCH BY MOONLIGHT by Kate Hawks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 12, 2001

"A fine idea for a romance novel, but unfortunately lacking the wild, die-for-you passion of the original."
A labored retelling of Alfred Noyes's famous poem The Highwayman. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

ROAD TRIPPIN’ IT WITH JOHN BURNINGHAM
by Julie Danielson

The holidays are nigh. I wrote this time last year about my favorite holiday picture book of all time – John Burningham’s Harvey Slumfenburger’s Christmas Present, originally published back in 1993.

I’m a big Burningham fan. (If you are, too, and you’ve not yet read this, run to your nearest bookstore or library.) And in thinking about Harvey, I was ...


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BLOG POST

JOHN NEWMAN
by Rhett Morgan

In 1992, John Newman prepared to celebrate finishing his Ph.D., securing a book deal with Warner Books for the release of his dissertation, JFK and Vietnam, and having worked directly with Oliver Stone as consultant on the film JFK. But a brief call from the National Security Agency put all of that in jeopardy. Newman was warned that his ...


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BLOG POST

JOHN T. EDGE
by Megan Labrise

John T. Edge’s The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South is no mere paean to peanuts, homage to hominy, and laudation to lard. Like the nutritive broth for which it’s named, this title is more substantive than it appears at a glance.

“One the primary aims of my book,” says Edge, a native Georgian who lives ...


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BLOG POST

SUMMER POTPOURRI
by Bobbi Dumas

Over the past month I’ve had the opportunity to listen to a bunch of books that came my way, and a couple of them were just terrific, so I thought I’d share.

Adriana Anders’ Under Her Skin (February ’17) launched an intense contemporary romance series Blank Canvas which has a very interesting spin on the tattoo theme. (It got a ...


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BLOG POST

WILD AND WONDERFUL
by Julie Danielson

At the end of John Cage and Lois Long’s Mud Book, we see a birthday cake made out of mud with dried dandelions for candles. To boot, we’ve been instructed prior to that precisely how to make a mud cake. “Make a wish,” this last page states with unequivocal glee.

I love this. Could there be a better antidote ...


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BLOG POST

MARCH ON
by Julie Danielson

This past weekend, I managed to catch the Atlanta March for Social Justice and Women while in town for the American Library Association’s Midwinter conference. If, like me, you marched (or couldn’t make one, yet wholeheartedly supported the notion of a march), you may wonder: What is next? I think a lot of people, women in particular, have this top ...


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