Search Results: "John Updike"


BOOK REVIEW

PIGEON FEATHERS by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1962

"For the connoisseurs, a collection of merit."
The eclat of this writer's career (The Poorhouse Fair, 1959, and Run. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUCHANAN DYING  by John Updike
Released: April 1, 1974

"Il est plus aise de connaitre l'homme en general, que de connaitre un homme en particulier' — might serve as a fitting clue to the fundamental absence of emotional interest, since the most revealing, intimate touch about Buchanan's character in Updike's dry, cold, statuesque play comes in an early stage direction: 'This is the so-called Back Bedroom, preferred by the dying man perhaps because, being over the kitchen, it was warm."
John Updike has made a stalwart attempt to rescue James Buchanan from historical oblivion — and failed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRAZIL by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"Saul Bellow's finest book, Henderson the Rain King, is still unchallenged as the only American novel of our era to do that."
The indefatigable Updike only occasionally succeeds here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLF DREAMS by John Updike
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"An enjoyable experience cover-to-cover and tee-to-green."
This gathering of 30 previously published fictional works, articles, and essays demonstrates Updike's "impassioned but imperfect devotion" to the game of golf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WIDOWS OF EASTWICK by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 2008

"A work of old age that takes its time, gently drawing us into its knowing orbit. We inhabit this story as we do the later stages of our own lives. Some will not like the book, but it is a vital part of the Updike experience."
Once again summoning characters from his previous books, Updike catches up with the fetching trio of amateur sorceresses introduced in The Witches of Eastwick (1984). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RABBIT IS RICH by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 1981

"Still, whatever its limitations as a narrative, this is commanding work from a writer whose great, wide intelligence is probably unrivaled in American fiction: Rabbit lives, if perhaps a bit less vitally now, and most serious readers will want to keep track of him."
Should Updike's longer fiction prove truly lasting, it may well be in the form of the Rabbit novels—if only because they will so precisely tell future generations what the aging, late-20th-century industrial East of the US was like in sight, smell, sound, and social economy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COUP by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 7, 1978

"As serious work, even serious comedy, it never invites any species of emotional involvement—and never straightens out its curlicues enough to hit home."
Updike's long interest in African literature was bound to up and produce something like this eventually. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WITCHES OF EASTWICK by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1984

"But what you keep coming back to, on nearly every page, is Updike's landscapist's paintbox—which is grand and lush and astonishingly fluid."
Updike once more, as in A Month of Sundays, is writing in homage to Hawthorne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGIC FLUTE by John Updike
Released: Oct. 15, 1962

"The adventures of Tamino and Pamina, Papageno and Papagena come to life in this junior libretto which can serve to prepare youngsters for the opera itself."
The main musical themes scattered throughout the story embellish an exciting adaptation of Mozart's classic opera. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUPLES by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 1968

"It is relevant, identifiable and unconditionally involving."
The critical contention has been that John Updike is a major talent who has never written a major novel—all have turned in on a limited range of experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CENTAUR by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 4, 1962

"The transition of the relationship between father, no longer demigod, and son, comes through with a signal tenderness and implements Updike's established virtues, the glittering and polished prose and the mature alliance of form, function and symbol."
As in his previous books, the tension here is in the style and words as well as in the narrative, and the worlds of George Caldwell and his 15 year old son Peter are heightened and illumined by them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE COMPLETE HENRY BECH by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 12, 2001

"A goldmine for future Updike scholars."
An attractive summary volume brings together the contents of Updike's three earlier collections of tales about the literary and amorous exploits and embarrassments of his "other" alter ego (the obverse of Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom): the unproductive, easily distracted American-Jewish novelist (and improbably Nobel laureate) Henry Bech. Read full book review >