Search Results: "John Updike"


BOOK REVIEW

PIGEON FEATHERS by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1962

"For the connoisseurs, a collection of merit."
The eclat of this writer's career (The Poorhouse Fair, 1959, and Run. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUCHANAN DYING  by John Updike
Released: April 1, 1974

"Il est plus aise de connaitre l'homme en general, que de connaitre un homme en particulier' — might serve as a fitting clue to the fundamental absence of emotional interest, since the most revealing, intimate touch about Buchanan's character in Updike's dry, cold, statuesque play comes in an early stage direction: 'This is the so-called Back Bedroom, preferred by the dying man perhaps because, being over the kitchen, it was warm."
John Updike has made a stalwart attempt to rescue James Buchanan from historical oblivion — and failed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRAZIL by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 9, 1994

"Saul Bellow's finest book, Henderson the Rain King, is still unchallenged as the only American novel of our era to do that."
The indefatigable Updike only occasionally succeeds here. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 21, 1983

"The least lazy of our critics, he may now be our best."
It's entirely possible that history's choice for the finest literary critic to find steady exposure in the pages of the New Yorker will not be Edmund Wilson—but rather John Updike, who here gathers over 100 reviews and essays from recent years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOLF DREAMS by John Updike
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"An enjoyable experience cover-to-cover and tee-to-green."
This gathering of 30 previously published fictional works, articles, and essays demonstrates Updike's "impassioned but imperfect devotion" to the game of golf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WITCHES OF EASTWICK by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1984

"But what you keep coming back to, on nearly every page, is Updike's landscapist's paintbox—which is grand and lush and astonishingly fluid."
Updike once more, as in A Month of Sundays, is writing in homage to Hawthorne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUPLES by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 12, 1968

"It is relevant, identifiable and unconditionally involving."
The critical contention has been that John Updike is a major talent who has never written a major novel—all have turned in on a limited range of experience. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CENTAUR by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 4, 1962

"The transition of the relationship between father, no longer demigod, and son, comes through with a signal tenderness and implements Updike's established virtues, the glittering and polished prose and the mature alliance of form, function and symbol."
As in his previous books, the tension here is in the style and words as well as in the narrative, and the worlds of George Caldwell and his 15 year old son Peter are heightened and illumined by them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WIDOWS OF EASTWICK by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 2008

"A work of old age that takes its time, gently drawing us into its knowing orbit. We inhabit this story as we do the later stages of our own lives. Some will not like the book, but it is a vital part of the Updike experience."
Once again summoning characters from his previous books, Updike catches up with the fetching trio of amateur sorceresses introduced in The Witches of Eastwick (1984). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1975

"A feat of sorts as well — although many readers will be uncomfortable in the hot seat that is his pew."
Purely and simply, or rather impurely and not so simply, this is the Updike man, whether in vestments or not, we have often met before — the lacerated Calvinist, here a Barthian (Barth after all is the most unobtainable — "opacity triumphant"), as divided as sin and salvation particularly when it comes to adultery which is our inherent and inevitable condition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRUST ME by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1987

"Consistently shimmering prose can't relieve the deadening sameness of Updike's narratives, too many of which rely on easy ironies and predictable patterns of behavior."
Here's a lot more suburban sex and Protestant redemption—22 stories to be exact—from one of America's most prolific and accomplished prose stylists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MUSIC SCHOOL by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 12, 1966

"A high standard for the genre as well as modern fiction."
A collection of the Old Hand's short stories, all of which appeared in The New Yorker magazine. Read full book review >