Search Results: "John le Carré"


BOOK REVIEW

A LEGACY OF SPIES by John le Carré
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Any reader who knows le Carré's earlier work, and quite a few who don't, will assume that any attempt to second-guess the mandarins of the Service will backfire. The miracle is that the author can revisit his best-known story and discover layer upon layer of fresh deception beneath it."
After having turned from his peerless chronicles of George Smiley and his fellow spies to the tale of his own life (The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life, 2016), le Carré returns to put yet another spin on the events of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ABSOLUTE FRIENDS by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 12, 2004

"Despite a piercing, compassionate portrait of a decent man struggling to keep up with a world in the throes of constant change, le Carré seems this time outpaced by his impossible subject: the layers upon layers of real-life duplicity in the world since 9/11."
The collapse of the new world order catches still another of le Carré's inoffensive spies out hopelessly past his depth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SINGLE & SINGLE by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 2, 1999

"Deprived of the great subject of Cold War espionage he handled better than any other novelist, le Carre now argues that individual greed, not ideology, is the villain to watch out for, and individual enterprise the only possible hope."
Now that the Evil Empire has fallen, le Carre (The Tailor of Panama, 1996, etc.) continues to explore the endless opportunities for junior-grade evil when East meets West through the accommodating offices of a wealthy banking family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TAILOR OF PANAMA by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 20, 1996

"Le Carre goes back to the spy story's roots—Our Man in Havana, with a touch of Conrad's Secret Agent—to amuse frazzled millennialists with the refreshing news that we've all been here many times before."
The fate of nations hinges on an inoffensive bespoke tailor in this archly ironic parable out of Graham Greene. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMILEY'S PEOPLE by John le Carré
Released: Jan. 2, 1979

"But one warning: the Smiley books really must be read in order, not just for the sake of their secrets, but in order to feel the full swing and pull of le Carre's triumph—perhaps the greatest variety, texture, and integrity ever bestowed upon a series character."
Since writing the ultimate modern espionage fiction—The Spy Who Came in From the Cold and Tinker, Tailor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HONOURABLE SCHOOLBOY by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1977

"But if Le Carre is the Henry lames of spy novelists, firing more nuances than bullets, this is his Golden Bowl—dense, hard, and gleaming on the outside, clark within, and worth possessing whatever the price."
The aftermath of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy: the ascendancy of spychief George Smiley, the wholesale dismantling and piecemeal rebuilding of Britain's betrayed intelligence service, and Le Carre's longest, deepest, and quietest incisions into the gentlemen who steal secrets, hide bodies, and rarely blink. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 10, 1963

"It is all expertly chilling and exciting."
A modern variant of The Third Man is sponsored by that book's author (Graham Greene says, "The best spy story I have ever read") and it introduces on this side of the water pseudonymous Mr. Le Carré, who is a fine contrast to flamboyant Mr. Fleming and who proves here that one can be just as unnerving by being thoroughly undemonstrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DELICATE TRUTH by John le Carré
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 7, 2013

"Resolutely keeping potential action sequences just offstage, le Carré (Our Kind of Traitor, 2010, etc.) focuses instead on the moral rot and creeping terror barely concealed by the affable old-boy blather that marks the pillars of the intelligence community."
The distinguished chronicler of Cold War espionage and its costs casts his cold eye on the fog of war and its legacy when the war sets terrorists against the mercenaries and independent contractors to whom international security has been farmed out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A MOST WANTED MAN by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 1, 2008

"The story can't possibly end well, and it doesn't. But le Carré (The Mission Song, 2006, etc.), without lecturing, deftly puts human faces and human costs on the paranoid response to the threat of terrorism."
Government knaves and compromised idealists duel over the fate of an alleged terrorist in le Carré's latest examination of The Way We Spy Now. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CONSTANT GARDENER by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 9, 2001

"Under all the sumptuous detail, sensitive psychology, and incisive condemnation of industrial cartels, this is still at its core the old, familiar story of a decent man driven to avenge the wife he never really knew."
In the absence of the Evil Empire, global capitalism takes it on the chin once more in this hypertrophied whodunit, the most intimate of le Carré's thrillers since the salad days of George Smiley. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RUSSIA HOUSE by John le Carré
Released: June 9, 1989

"Still, Barley is a grand, Dickensian creation, the ugly Americans are a richly diverting crew, and this is witty, shapely tale-spinning from a modern master."
Does glasnost mean the Cold War is over? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A SMALL TOWN IN GERMANY by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 21, 1968

In Bonn. . .even the flies are official." Read full book review >