Search Results: "John le Carré"


BOOK REVIEW

ABSOLUTE FRIENDS by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 12, 2004

"Despite a piercing, compassionate portrait of a decent man struggling to keep up with a world in the throes of constant change, le Carré seems this time outpaced by his impossible subject: the layers upon layers of real-life duplicity in the world since 9/11."
The collapse of the new world order catches still another of le Carré's inoffensive spies out hopelessly past his depth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PERFECT SPY by John le Carré
Released: May 1, 1986

"Still, if less masterly than either the Karla trilogy or The Spy Who Came In From the Cold, this is a much plainer, finer accomplishment than The Little Drummer Girl—while the long memoir sections allow le Carré to write his richest, most unabashedly Dickensian prose yet: occasionally self-conscious or precious, often stirring, magical, gravely joyous."
The "perfect spy" in this bitter, stately le Carré novel—more character-study than thriller—is Magnus Pym, 50-ish, a senior spymaster for Britain, based in Vienna. . .but now, suddenly, disappeared, after returning to England for the funeral of his old father, Rick. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NAIVE AND SENTIMENTAL LOVER by John le Carré
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1971

"It leads you on even where it may never take you in."
Moving out of the suspense field while retaining some high-handed elements of surmise, almost closer to John Fowles in its dramatic largesse, this is the story of another self-styled magus and his interreaction with his opposite following an overreaching construct derived from Schiller about the naive and sentimental lovers of the title. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER

"The ambivalence of the agents about their work and its anti-ethical aspects lifts this to the thinking man's level of reflective relaxation."
... has already been casting back the image of the staggering sales racked up by The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE DRUMMER GIRL by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 1, 1982

"So Smiley followers may be in for a slight let-down, but they—and others—will want to read every word nonetheless."
Underneath the grand, stately textures and rich, ironic nuances (which make this new, non-Smiley le Carre novel superior reading), there's a surprisingly conventional thriller-romance here—something of a step backward, perhaps, from the originality and moral/psychological delicacy of the Smiley-Karla trilogy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DELICATE TRUTH by John le Carré
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 7, 2013

"Resolutely keeping potential action sequences just offstage, le Carré (Our Kind of Traitor, 2010, etc.) focuses instead on the moral rot and creeping terror barely concealed by the affable old-boy blather that marks the pillars of the intelligence community."
The distinguished chronicler of Cold War espionage and its costs casts his cold eye on the fog of war and its legacy when the war sets terrorists against the mercenaries and independent contractors to whom international security has been farmed out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET PILGRIM by John le Carré
Released: Jan. 14, 1990

"Le Carre's earlier novels have made distinguished films and TV miniseries; this one, sure to attract the author's usual huge print audience, reads like a series of sketches for a weekly program—say, Spies Who Came in from the Cold."
Chippings from a master's chisel: ten short stories and an epilogue artfully disguised as a novel of post-glasnost reminiscences of espionage, all showing le Carre at his most nervously relaxed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHT MANAGER by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 7, 1993

"Despite the familiarity of the story's outlines, le Carre shows his customary mastery in the details—from Jonathan's self-lacerating momentum to the intricacies of interagency turf wars—and reveals once again why nobody writes espionage fiction with his kind of authority."
Le Carre returns to the same subject as his disappointingly episodic The Secret Pilgrim—the fate of espionage in the new world order—but now looks forward instead of backward, showing a not-quite innocent mangled between that new order and the old one, whose course le Carre has so peerlessly chronicled for 30 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUR GAME by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 10, 1995

The great subject that's fascinated le Carre (The Night Manager, 1993, etc.) throughout his career — what happens to the masters of tradecraft in a world that doesn't match their trade — comes in for unsettlingly timely treatment in this latest tale of spies grown too old and knowing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISSION SONG by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 19, 2006

"Another fine work of intrigue from a skilled interpreter of all things topical."
A half-British, half-Congolese interpreter unwittingly finds himself in the middle of a political struggle between two countries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LEGACY OF SPIES by John le Carré
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Any reader who knows le Carré's earlier work, and quite a few who don't, will assume that any attempt to second-guess the mandarins of the Service will backfire. The miracle is that the author can revisit his best-known story and discover layer upon layer of fresh deception beneath it."
After having turned from his peerless chronicles of George Smiley and his fellow spies to the tale of his own life (The Pigeon Tunnel: Stories from My Life, 2016), le Carré returns to put yet another spin on the events of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUR KIND OF TRAITOR by John le Carré
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 12, 2010

Le Carré uses still another aspect of international relations in the new world order—the powerful, equivocal position of money launderers to the Russian mob—to put a new spin on a favorite theme: the betrayal that inevitably follows from sharply divided loyalties. Read full book review >