Search Results: "Jon Stock"


BOOK REVIEW

DEAD SPY RUNNING by Jon Stock
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2010

"A welcome addition to contemporary spy fiction that conveys with riveting details the complexity of global terrorism."
A discredited British spy seeks to rehabilitate himself and exonerate his deceased father—wrongly besmirched former head of MI6—while trotting the globe to escape the old man's enemies and prevent the new American president from being assassinated. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GAMES TRAITORS PLAY by Jon Stock
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 27, 2012

"Scattered clichés and a threadbare Mata Hari subplot aside, this one will please fans."
Ploys and counter-ploys, motives sincere and suspicious, agents trustworthy and treacherous—plus a daunting lexicon of spy-agency jargon, terms and acronyms—highlight a complex thriller about the search for a "most wanted" terrorist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIRTY LITTLE SECRET by Jon Stock
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 26, 2013

"Though some readers may be bothered by the novel's anti-Americanisms and others will find Dhar too sympathetically drawn, such strokes are part of Stock's deft contemporization of the spy genre."
In the third installment of a superb series, renegade MI6 operative Daniel Marchant and his half brother, most-wanted terrorist Salim Dhar, again prove the most dangerous of odd couples. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 30, 1990

Three more titles in Stock's "Festive Year," these very simple narratives feature small children interacting with friends and mothers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 25, 2002

"A breath of fresh air to fuel the debate now raging in Congress and the White House—with more surely to come."
A visionary lays out a future in which humankind is enhanced beyond our wildest dreams . . . Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DAY WE DANCED IN UNDERPANTS by Sarah Wilson
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2008

"Not a necessity, but a colorful summertime beat-the-heat story—and what child can resist a story about skivvies? (Picture book. 4-7)"
I see London, I see France, I see Papa's underpants! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER THE KILL by Darrin Lunde
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 2011

"Pair this with Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen's Flying Eagle, illustrated by Deborah Kogan Ray (2009), for more 'nature red in tooth and claw' science. (Informational picture book. 7-10) "
When a lioness kills a zebra, the carcass becomes food not only for her pride but also for vultures, hyenas, jackals and, finally, meat-eating beetles that clean the skeleton, leaving it to turn to dust on Africa's Serengeti Plain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUS AND GRANDPA RIDE THE TRAIN by Claudia Mills
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1998

"The stories and art have a deceptive simplicity missing from the first book, and carry understated messages of love and sharing between a boy and his kindly grandfather; as Mills makes clear, they may be a bit forgetful, but they never forget that they love each other. (Fiction. 5-8)"
In another affectionate look at Gus and Grandpa (1997), the pair exhibit their mutual passion for trains. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN ISLAND CHRISTMAS by Lynn Joseph
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 21, 1992

"A welcome contribution. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In the vernacular Joseph used so effectively in A Wave in Her Pocket (1991, ALA Notable), Rosie describes her family's preparations for a Trinidad Christmas: plucking sorrel to make a traditional drink, baking currant cake, welcoming the ``parang'' men who serenade from house to house, repainting the guava branch the family uses as a tree. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BY THE DAWN'S EARLY LIGHT by Karen Ackerman
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"Also available in Spanish (ISBN: 0-689-31917-7). (Picture book. 4-8)"
Rachel introduces her family—Mom, Nana, and younger brother Josh—and describes life with a mother who works a ``graveyard shift,'' detailing her workday at a factory and the concurrent events at home from dinner and bedtime to ``the dawn's early light''—a special time the children sometimes share with Mom by getting up at 4 a.m. when she gets home. Read full book review >