Search Results: "Jonathan Moore"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DARK ROOM by Jonathan  Moore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"San Francisco has never been so menacing."
Moore's (The Poison Artist, 2016, etc.) complex and often deeply disturbing crime noir set in the City by the Bay delves into dark subjects and the insidious nature of true evil. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE POISON ARTIST by Jonathan  Moore
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 26, 2016

"Absinthe, oysters, the painter John Singer Sargent, a classic car, and a string of disturbing deaths, possibly brought about by poison, make this dark tale memorable."
A mysterious woman, a breakup, and a man haunted by his bloody and dark past coalesce in Moore's moody thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"Not all readers will agree with Marty's insightful reflections on the relationship between politics and religion, but his essay is a useful starting point for anyone interested in the role of religion in America's public life."
In a thoughtful antidote to the arguments that usually dominate discussions of politics and religion, Marty (The One and Many, 1997, etc.) here invites us instead to enter into a conversation about the relationship between the two. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

JONATHAN DEE
by Rachel Sugar

Jonathan Dee’s latest, an exquisitely nuanced drama of simmering small-town politics, is so prescient—so uncannily current—it’s a source of concern. “I worry a little bit the novel is close enough to current events that people are going to read it a little too much as if it were a key to current events,” Dee says.

But if The Locals ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

COUNT THE WAYS, LITTLE BROWN BEAR by Jonathan London
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"However, older ones, with a surer grasp on their number line, will enjoy this clever foray into counting. (Picture book. 3-6)"
An evening repast enjoyed outdoors inspires a flurry of counting games for a mother bear and her young cub. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OH, LITTLE JACK by Inga Moore
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 1992

"These soft, warm drawings are precious, in the best sense. (Picture book. 2-4)"
A simple, predictable story about a little rabbit who's too small to help his parents or join the play of his older siblings; fortunately, the tricycle Granpa has fixed for him is just the right size, as is Granpa's lap when they share a book later that evening. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BIG DAY FOR LITTLE JACK by Inga Moore
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"Only someone with a heart of stone wouldn't love the winsome Rabbit family and this charming, undidactic approach to fears of the unknown. (Fiction/Picture book. 3+)"
When the youngest of the Rabbit clan (Oh, Little Jack, 1992, etc.) is invited to his first party, the rest of the family helps him get ready. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VODNÍK by Bryce Moore
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"A shy boy blossoms in this surprisingly witty debut. (author's note, further reading) (Fantasy. 11-16)"
An American teen encounters monsters both fantastical and human in the land of his birth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAUGHT IN THE ACT by Peter Moore
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2005

"Physical danger lurks beneath the layers of psychological suspense in a satisfyingly logical, killer conclusion. (Fiction. YA)"
Newcomer Lydia knows how to get power and how to use it, as Ethan explains in this narrative detailing his gradual submission to her. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLIND SIGHTED by Peter Moore
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"Unexpectedly engaging. (Fiction. YA)"
Smaller than most seventh graders, not cool, not interested and not achieving, Kirk is a junior who writes poetry during class and heads for the library to work at shelving books after school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANGELS ON THE ROOF by Martha Moore
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"A strong story, whose outwardly fragile protagonists possess reserves of steel to carry them through to the end. (Fiction. 12+)"
From Shelby's point of view, her mother Zoe is impossible: She's uprooted them so many times Shelby has lost count, and develops temporary obsessions, like decorating the living room with pages from a Georgia O'Keeffe calendar. Read full book review >