Search Results: "Jonathan Ames"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2000

"Angstridden sex is funny, à la Philip Roth; tongueincheek memoirs are funny, à la David Sedaris. Ames can be their water-boy for now, and maybe he'll join their company when he lets his humor develop organically rather than throwing it into the reader's face."
A mildly perverted, mildly humorous compilation of Ames's New York Press columns into one chunky memoir of sexridden angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2009

"Inconsistent but filled with its share of Ames classics."
A grab bag of fact and fiction from Ames (The Alcoholic, 2008, etc.), shot through with his trademark self-loathing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE EXTRA MAN by Jonathan Ames
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 3, 1998

"It's just plain fun to watch these quasi-misfits fall for each other."
Ames follows I Pass Like Night (1989) with a gentle account of a burgeoning friendship between two likable oddballs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I LOVE YOU MORE THAN YOU KNOW by Jonathan Ames
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2006

"Rare flashes of wit and energy, mostly drowned out by a sea of self-indulgent ramblings."
Humorist Ames (Wake Up, Sir!, 2004, etc.) presents previously published essays detailing the various ways in which he's stumbled, failed, disappointed himself and others and, occasionally, triumphed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAKE UP, SIR! by Jonathan Ames
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"Pungent and hilarious, if completely off the deep end: Ames is like a perpetual undergraduate jokester, whom you either love or hate on first sight."
A demented picaresque about a Portnoy-ish neurotic (and his valet) who leaves the safety of Montclair, New Jersey, and heads for the untamed wilds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2002

"Just once, Jonathan, let go and try writing with both fists."
Clever, self-involved performer and author Ames (What's Not to Love?, 2000, etc.) can't seem to let himself alone, mentally or physically, and he gleefully tells us all about it in this gathering of newspaper essays, journal entries, fiction, and miscellany. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONATHAN SWIFT by Leo Damrosch
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"A rich and rewarding portrait of an irreplaceable genius."
A feisty, first-class life of the sage and scourge of English Literature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONATHAN EDWARDS by Philip F. Gura
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 2005

"Controversial, and a quick, enjoyable read. Gura will grab at least some of the audience of armchair-history-lovers that professional historians always claim they want to reach."
A gauntlet-throwing biography of the 18th-century minister and theologian who's in the pantheon of great American intellectuals, along with Thomas Jefferson, W.E.B. DuBois, and the James brothers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONATHAN SWIFT by John Stubbs
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 3, 2017

"A rich and sweeping story superbly told."
A resplendent biography of the "most notorious writer of his day." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONATHAN UNLEASHED by Meg Rosoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 2016

"No bones about it, readers of this charmer are in for a real treat."
Jonathan's dogs are having an existential crisis. Or maybe it's just him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JONATHAN ROBERTS by Gregory P. Wilson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 12, 2014

"An exhaustive biography, which serves as a welcome addition to American Civil War and Quaker history.
"
Wilson chronicles the life of Jonathan Roberts, a Quaker who served in the Union Army during the Civil War despite his pacifist convictions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 21, 2009

"A heartwarming account, ripe for discussion in women's book clubs and women's studies classes."
An in-depth look at the enduring bond of friendship among a tightly knit group of middle-class Midwestern women born in the early 1960s. Read full book review >