Search Results: "Jose Marechal"


BOOK REVIEW

COFFEE-TIME TREATS by Jose Marechal
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"A charming, glossy book of sweet Parisian morsels."
Delectable, butter-heavy French delights made easy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSE LIMON by José Limón
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 12, 1999

"He is a master storyteller, with language as with his body. (30 photos)"
A beautifully written memoir of a modern dance pioneer whose legacy includes his masterpiece retelling of Othello, The Moore's Pavane, and the company that bears his name. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE

"A mad masala of mythology and absurd mayhem that takes an unexpectedly poignant twist.
"
Thekkumthala's magical-realist comic-cosmic phantasmagoria welcomes readers to a bizarre community in India, where a notoriously haunted landmark mansion sees UFO aliens, disappearances, drug crimes, murder, and madcap paranormal phenomena. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GUNS IN THE CLOSET by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"It is useful to have his stories collected in one volume, but it's also clear that Yglesias was always a more effective writer when he worked on a larger canvas."
A posthumous gathering of tales by the noted Cuban-American writer (The Old Gents, see below). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A WAKE IN YBOR CITY by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1998

"Yglesias's grasp of immigrant family dynamics is masterly, but the stylistic assurance and narrative economy displayed in his mature fiction (Double Double, 1974, The Truth About Them, 1971, etc.) are only faintly adumbrated by this less even apprentice work."
The "thirty-fifth anniversary edition" (really, now) of the late Cuban-American writer's 1963 debut novel—an authoritative though imperfectly constructed story set in Tampa's Latino section (Ybor City) in 1958, on the eve of the Cuban Revolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CUSTODIANS by Nicholas Jose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 1998

"Still, Jose does offer an illuminating take on contemporary Australia."
Lives intersect too neatly in this intellectually provocative latest from storywriter and novelist Jose (The Rose Crossing, 1996, etc.)—a tale that's as much about a group of friends as their native Australia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMBALLORE THOMA by Jose Thekkumthala
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 12, 2017

"A flavorful mix of genres and influences, especially captivating for fans of Indian storytelling."
A magical-realist narrative follows a large, eccentric family in India—from dealing with the impoverished years after 1947 to finally solving the supernatural mystery plaguing the clan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE OLD GENTS by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1996

"An unsatisfyingly abrupt ending can't dim the glow of the low-key pleasures to be had here."
Yglesias's last novel, published by the same house that has recently issued the Break-In (p. 259) and a collection of the author's stories (see above). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSE CROSSING by Nicholas Jose
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1996

"He fumbles only in imposing too abrupt and mechanical an end on his odd, engaging characters."
A fable, set in the 17th century, filled with vivid evocations of another time, wonderfully peculiar characters, and driven by a rather chilly vision of fate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BREAK-IN by Jose Yglesias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"In bringing this defiant old wreck to a recognition of what he has in common with a confused black kid, Yglesias has fashioned a novel that some may dismiss as simplistic; others, though, will discover that it both moves them and makes them think."
A hard-won lesson in race relations and an appealing character study are the distinguishing features of the absorbing and entertaining latest from the author, Tristan and the Hispanics (1989), etc. Seventy-two-year-old widower Rudy Pardo, a retired fire chief, lives just ``uptown'' from Tampa's Latino community, a comfortable distance from his annoyingly helpful older sisters Lucinda (and her pathetic, unemployable son ``Little Stevie'') and ``liberal'' Connie (and her ``communist'' husband). Read full book review >