Search Results: "Joseph S. Nye Jr"


BOOK REVIEW

THE POWER GAME by Joseph S. Nye Jr.
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 2004

"Another superficial treatment of Washington as a sinkhole for careers and marriages. Meanwhile, the moral issue of pre-emption is obscured by operational details."
Debut fiction, set in the near future, from Nye (The Paradox of American Power, 2002, etc.), Clinton's Assistant Secretary of Defense: a bland mix of turf wars, marriage wars, and the threat of religious war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2001

"A sanguine assessment of our sanguinary times."
A former Assistant Secretary of Defense in the Clinton administration, currently dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, optimistically predicts that the US will retain its current dominance in world affairs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FUTURE OF POWER by Joseph S. Nye Jr.
NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"A great reminder that fear and hate are not the only tools used to sell books these days—a substantial work that should be read by anyone with an interest in how politics works."
Illuminating analysis of the mechanisms of power shaping global politics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH by Shelia P. Moses
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 28, 2008

"Moses's heart-wrenching story of a young man's struggle to cut ties with his mother and a dead-end life will leave readers profoundly moved. (Fiction. 12-16)"
It is hard to imagine a more irresponsible, indifferent, negligent mother than the one 15-year-old Joseph Flood has endured. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOD JR. by Dennis Cooper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"A refreshing departure from the obsessive redundancy of its predecessors. Probably Cooper's best yet."
And now for something different from the master of homosexual punk sadomasochism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BILL NYE THE SCIENCE GUY by Disney Publishing Worldwide
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 13, 2013

"Not deep but broad and effective in conveying some of the pleasures of scientific enquiry along with the overcaffeinated personality of the show's host. (iPad game app. 7-10)"
The Science Guy celebrates 20 years on the air (including reruns) with a modest but diverse pocketful of science games, demos and random facts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COUSIN JOSEPH by Jules Feiffer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 26, 2016

"Expertly off-kilter."
In this prequel to his graphic novel, Kill My Mother (2014), Feiffer delivers another noir fever dream, sending America right to the top of the flagpole with a hard-boiled, lyrical punch of immigrant stories, labor relations, and the almighty dollar. Read full book review >