Search Results: "Joseph Wambaugh"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"Exhaustively overworked, yet provides essential closure."
Sprawling, sensational case history of an innocent man's conviction and unprecedented exoneration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1973

"Nothing if not readable which is enough for his constituency."
A slight change from his two similar New Centurion-Blue Knight novels — a burly story of crime and punishment in which, dead or alive, all are victims of the same slugs with which two sociopaths kill one policeman but leave his partner to face another kind of destruction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH by Shelia P. Moses
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Oct. 28, 2008

"Moses's heart-wrenching story of a young man's struggle to cut ties with his mother and a dead-end life will leave readers profoundly moved. (Fiction. 12-16)"
It is hard to imagine a more irresponsible, indifferent, negligent mother than the one 15-year-old Joseph Flood has endured. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHOIRBOYS by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Oct. 29, 1975

"Certainly not for William Holden, possibly for Charles Bronson—a brutal, brutalizing book-a obscenity in a toilet stall, a old centurion's duck soup?"
"You got balls like a elephant and a whang like a ox. . . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD HILLS by Joseph Wambaugh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 2010

"Though everything takes forever to happen, the laughs are authentic, and a couple of endearing heroes emerge. A middling entry in this waggish series."
Wambaugh's Hollywood trilogy (Hollywood Moon, 2009, etc.) sprouts a fourth volume, another offbeat mix of broadly satirical comedy and a cast of cops apparently waiting for a procedural that never kicks in. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD MOON by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 24, 2009

"Well below Wambaugh's customary high standard."
A police procedural coexists with the story of an identity-theft operation in this follow-up to Hollywood Station (2006) and Hollywood Crows (2008). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HARBOR NOCTURNE by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 10, 2012

"A welcome recovery from the middling Hollywood Hills (2010), with enough juice for one wild miniseries."
The harbor district of San Pedro turns out to be just as jam-packed with dangerous criminals, clueless cops and variously complicit citizens as anywhere else in Wambaugh's storied Hollywood Division. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD STATION by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 28, 2006

"Former LAPD detective Wambaugh returns to his roots for a hilarious review of today's police force."
Wambaugh's pleasing new police procedural (Floaters, 1996, etc.) is a series of comic vignettes featuring a particularly idiosyncratic and beleaguered division of the LAPD—the Hollywood Station. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDEN ORANGE by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: May 14, 1990

Wambaugh returns to the novel after two spellbinding nonfiction police procedurals (Echoes in the Darkness, 1986; The Blooding, 1988), and again—as in The Secrets of Harry Bright, 1985—ties in with an alcoholic ex-cop protagonist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 10, 1985

"The force of alcohol addiction and the essence of self deception in the disease are brought home strongly."
Sidney Blackpool, another divorced, alcoholic Wambaugh homicide detective with the L.A.P.D. whose son Tommy died in a surfing accident a year ago, is plucked from his familiar environs and set down in windy, sand-blasted Mineral Springs, the scratchy underbelly of chi-chi Palm Springs, and promised a very cushy retirement job if he can uncover the likely murderer of multimillionaire Victor Watson's playboy son Jack, who was found burned to a crisp in the desert, with a bullet in his skull. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLOODING by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Feb. 16, 1988

"A powerful and elegant police procedural."
Wambaugh's darkest nonfiction since The Onion Field: a sleek and steadily gripping chronicle of the rape/murder of two English girls and of the relentless manhunt for the killer, finally nabbed through the nascent technique of genetic fingerprinting. Read full book review >