Search Results: "Joseph Wambaugh"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1973

"Nothing if not readable which is enough for his constituency."
A slight change from his two similar New Centurion-Blue Knight novels — a burly story of crime and punishment in which, dead or alive, all are victims of the same slugs with which two sociopaths kill one policeman but leave his partner to face another kind of destruction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLOODING by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Feb. 16, 1988

"A powerful and elegant police procedural."
Wambaugh's darkest nonfiction since The Onion Field: a sleek and steadily gripping chronicle of the rape/murder of two English girls and of the relentless manhunt for the killer, finally nabbed through the nascent technique of genetic fingerprinting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD HILLS by Joseph Wambaugh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 16, 2010

"Though everything takes forever to happen, the laughs are authentic, and a couple of endearing heroes emerge. A middling entry in this waggish series."
Wambaugh's Hollywood trilogy (Hollywood Moon, 2009, etc.) sprouts a fourth volume, another offbeat mix of broadly satirical comedy and a cast of cops apparently waiting for a procedural that never kicks in. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD MOON by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 24, 2009

"Well below Wambaugh's customary high standard."
A police procedural coexists with the story of an identity-theft operation in this follow-up to Hollywood Station (2006) and Hollywood Crows (2008). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLLYWOOD STATION by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 28, 2006

"Former LAPD detective Wambaugh returns to his roots for a hilarious review of today's police force."
Wambaugh's pleasing new police procedural (Floaters, 1996, etc.) is a series of comic vignettes featuring a particularly idiosyncratic and beleaguered division of the LAPD—the Hollywood Station. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GOLDEN ORANGE by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: May 14, 1990

Wambaugh returns to the novel after two spellbinding nonfiction police procedurals (Echoes in the Darkness, 1986; The Blooding, 1988), and again—as in The Secrets of Harry Bright, 1985—ties in with an alcoholic ex-cop protagonist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLOATERS by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1996

"But his cop raunch, while amusing, has begun to pale."
Fun-loving cop-novelist Wambaugh (Finnegan's Week, 1993, etc.) centers his latest San Diego police procedural around the international America's Cup regatta off Mission Bay and, as ever, comes up with a taut tale larded with raunchy dialogue. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ECHOES IN THE DARKNESS by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Feb. 16, 1986

"Wambaugh charges ahead masterfully at 90 miles an hour and even manages to trim the lengthy trial proceedings to a lively pace."
Wambaugh at his most waspishly funny, on the unlikely subjects of a murdered Pennsylvania family of three, a double murder, some flimflamming Sears robberies, a $750,000 life-insurance seam, shoplifting—and a generally impotent Don Juan sworn to chastity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FUGITIVE NIGHTS by Joseph Wambaugh
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 15, 1992

"Wambaugh cannot write a total wipeout but this is not among his strongest or more durable works."
Wambaugh (The Golden Orange, 1990, etc.) returns to a familiar venue: glittering Palm Springs, its cops, and nearby desert canyons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LINES AND SHADOWS by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Feb. 16, 1983

"Tough, funny, and moving—with plenty of dead-on cop dialogue."
Strange and powerful cop-fact, from a past-master of cop-fiction: the story of ten San Diego police officers assigned to patrol, on foot, at night, the cactus-filled, snake-infested canyons along the Mexican border. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHOIRBOYS by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Oct. 29, 1975

"Certainly not for William Holden, possibly for Charles Bronson—a brutal, brutalizing book-a obscenity in a toilet stall, a old centurion's duck soup?"
"You got balls like a elephant and a whang like a ox. . . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NEW CENTURIONS by Joseph Wambaugh
Released: Jan. 30, 1971

"The author surely must have put in considerable mileage in the squad car, but because of the rush to proselytize, it's a little skimpy on fictional substance."
Undoubtedly authentic in word, deed and attitudes, but not really reaching where it's preaching — this case of three young policemen of the Los Angeles force confronting the coming debacle, or what is called here, the "dying" of the "don'ts." Read full book review >