Search Results: "Josh Stewart"


BOOK REVIEW

JIMMY STEWART by Marc Eliot
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2006

"Stout, readable story about how a nice guy got his acting chops and became one of Hollywood's greats."
An actor's life, presented admiringly—after all, the subject is a plain-spoken American beau ideal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"Not a wonderful account of a life. (50 b&w photos, not seen) (First printing of 50,000)"
Readers interested in finding out more about Stewart and his distinguished career, his signal roles in movies such as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Winchester '73, Harvey, and Vertigo, should steer far wide of this stunningly inept work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMES STEWART by Donald Dewey
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"A model of how to do a serious but entertaining Hollywood biography; Dewey never loses sight of the work, which is what makes Stewart important in the first place. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Biographer and novelist Dewey (Marcello Mastroianni, 1993; Reasonable Doubts, 1991) offers a voluminous, highly intelligent look at one of the richest and most complex of Hollywood star personas, not incidentally, one of the industry's most beloved actors. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIMMY STEWART by Roy Pickard
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 22, 1993

"Slim pickings on a tasty bird. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Largely scissors-and-paste celebio of Stewart, spiced with two interviews that Pickard, a British film scholar, conducted with the actor over the years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSH WHOEVER by Michael Guillebeau
Released: March 20, 2013

"First-timer Guillebeau, whose software programs reside in the International Space Station, churns out wisecracks with machine-gun rapidity. His plot may be improbable, but when the laughs come this fast and funny, who really cares?"
A con artist turns good Samaritan and pays the price. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OPERATION JOSH TAYLOR by Melody Fitzpatrick
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 27, 2015

"Hampered by generic characterizations, this amusingly voiced but not-quite-funny comedy of errors is enjoyable but fails to dazzle. (Fiction. 8-12)"
When 13-year-old Hannah Smart's parents refuse to buy her concert tickets to see her pinup idol, superstar singer Josh Taylor, she and her genius best friend, Rachel Carter, must come up with a way to earn the money themselves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST LIKE JOSH GIBSON by Angela Johnson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"Johnson never disappoints; in this one memory, family stories and baseball braid together a sweetly powerful and slyly subversive tale. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Peck's strong, evocative pastels with their vintage look are just right for Johnson's home run of a story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSH BAXTER LEVELS UP by Gavin Brown
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 23, 2016

"Smartly paced and emotionally engaging, a book even those who have never held a controller will enjoy. (Fiction. 10-14)"
A video game-obsessed middle schooler tackles his third new school in two years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Josh Climbs the Tree of Life by Lee Vranna
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 19, 2014

"A whimsical tale with plenty of zaniness that revolves around a sentimental and philosophical core."
A debut novel follows a teenager and his curious involvement with celestial beings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNEAKY SAM by Josh Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 10, 2012

"Keep an eye on this kid; one can only hope he'll sneak his way into another story or two. (iPad storybook app. 2-5)"
A brief but endearing tale about a mischievous little boy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOU’LL BE SORRY by Josh Schneider
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 17, 2007

"Though even younger ones will reckon the unlikelihood of ever being in the same (so to speak) boat with Samantha, they may come away at least a little more convinced of the frequent connection between rash acts and unforeseen consequences. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Sandwiched between Schneider's stout denials that the episode is based on personal experiences is a puckish tale of impulsive sibling violence and remorse in a family of Kevin Henkes-like mice. Read full book review >