Search Results: "Joy N. Hulme"


BOOK REVIEW

CLIMBING THE RAINBOW by Joy N. Hulme
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"Readers will want to see Dora's story continued. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Those who recall Dora Cookson from Through the Open Door (2000) will be pleased to follow her now that an operation has enabled her to speak. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THROUGH THE OPEN DOOR by Joy N. Hulme
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 31, 2000

"Dora's voice is definitely that of an adult recollecting, but what she tells is compelling enough to keep young readers listening. (author's note) (Fiction. 8-12)"
The first of a projected series of novels based on true family stories gathered by the author, this has the warmth of real life and a bit of the static quality of a sepia photograph. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EASTER BABIES by Joy N. Hulme
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"5', it will just fit into an oversized basket; make sure the kiddos brush their teeth after reading it. (Picture book. 2-5)"
"When signs of spring are in the air, / we look for babies everywhere!" Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY CLARE LIKES TO SHARE by Joy N. Hulme
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 24, 2006

"What could be a boring and didactic exercise in fractional story problems is instead a witty easy reader, combining breezy rhymes with cheerful illustrations of children of many different ethnicities. (Easy reader. 5-7)"
Mary Clare (who has red hair) is a kind little girl who is the soul of generosity. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILD FIBONACCI by Joy N. Hulme
NUMBERS AND COUNTING
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"It's an entirely novel way to present a very tricky idea, but it just doesn't add up quite right. (Picture book. 7+)"
The organizing principle of this unusual counting book is the mathematical Fibonacci sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, etc.), which, when plotted on a graph, forms an "equiangular spiral"—a curve frequently found in nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RITES OF PASSAGE by Joy N. Hensley
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 9, 2014

"Absolutely compelling. (Fiction. 14-18)"
The absorbing story of the first girl to join a fictional military high school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FINDING PARIS by Joy Preble
YOUNG ADULT
Released: April 21, 2015

"Fast-paced with intriguing teen characters, a budding relationship and a bit of mystery—curiosity will keep those pages turning. (Fiction. 13-17)"
Paranormal author Preble (The A-Word, 2014, etc.) crosses over to straight teen fiction with this drama wrapped in a mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HAUNTED by Joy Preble
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Entertaining, if quite a jumble. (Supernatural thriller. 12 & up)"
In this sequel to Dreaming Anastasia (2009), 17-year-old Anne faces up to the fact that she has a magical destiny that she cannot escape. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAMBOURINE MOON by Joy Jones
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Widener's illustrations capture the slate colors of the night sky, while his subdued tones in the city and country scenes turn the moon into a radiant lunar nightlight. (Picture book. 4-8)"
In a heartfelt story from Jones, a moonlit night and a tambourine link the past and present for a little girl and her grandfather. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STARBRIGHT AND THE DREAM EATER by Joy Cowley
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 30, 2000

"Though not up to the standards of such terror classics as Neal Shusterman's Eyes of Kid Midas (1992) or Margaret Mahy's Changeover (1984), this will still provide readers with some unnerving moments and a resourceful, self-confident heroine. (Fiction. 11-13)"
An alien predator that strikes through dreams threatens all humanity in this contrived but suspenseful import from the versatile Cowley (Red-Eyed Tree Frog, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED-EYED TREE FROG by Joy Cowley
Released: March 1, 1999

"The combination of such visually sophisticated pages and simplistic captions make this a top-heavy, unsatisfying title. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Bishop's spectacular photographs of the tiny red-eyed tree frog defeat an incidental text from Cowley (Singing Down the Rain, 1997, etc.). Read full book review >