Search Results: "Joy Richardson"


BOOK REVIEW

LOOKING AT PICTURES by Joy Richardson
MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: April 1, 1997

"Many of these are so small that that readers will only be able to focus on the frustration of not being able to see them more clearly. (Nonfiction. 8+)"
Art history for the populace is back in vogue; to that end, Richardson explores painted treasures from the National Gallery in London, covering both aesthetic considerations and technical ones, e.g., readers learn not only about perspective and Impressionism, but how paint is mixed and canvases are stretched. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRUNT by John Richardson
ANIMALS
Released: March 18, 2002

"A light-hearted tale that sends a worthwhile message to children. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A melancholy runt learns about happiness and self-acceptance from a genial boar. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HOUSE OF WINDJAMMER by V.A. Richardson
FICTION
Released: July 1, 2003

"Richardson sets the stage for sequels from the first chapter on, but few readers are likely to want to read them. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Stronger on 17th-century historical detail than plot or character, this overblown series opener stars a dimwitted, unlikable Amsterdam teenager who suddenly finds himself heir to a family business tottering on the edge of bankruptcy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AFTER HAMELIN by Bill Richardson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Likely to attract lovers of fairy-tales, but it will disappoint. (Fiction. 11-13)"
An expansion of the classic story of the pied piper, this tells of young Penelope, left behind when the piper returns for the children of Hamelin after saving the town from rats. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 13, 2001

"Richardson (The Sorcerer's Apprentice, a memoir, 1999), once head of Christie's US operations and now a contributor to Vanity Fair, the New Yorker, etc., proves again that he's one of our foremost biographers."
Engaging essays about an odd mix of artists, writers, tycoons, trendsetters, and con guys from the worlds of literature and art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Trust Fund Baby by Douglas Richardson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 28, 2013

"An impressive story of corruption, religion and friendship, and the lengths people go to for love."
A fascinating tale of a young man's downward spiral into depression. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG-DISTANCE RUNNER by Tony Richardson
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 22, 1993

"They should have talked- -though Richardson sparkles here nonetheless. (Thirty-two pages of b&w photos)"
A lean, mean, and ultimately engaging autobiography by the British producer-director, finished six years before his death from AIDS in 1991. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GERONIMO'S GOLD by Ted Richardson
FICTION & LITERATURE

"An involving tale that proves a modest artifact can lead to a grand adventure."
A historical incident influences a modern economic conspiracy in this thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DARK HORSE by Doug Richardson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Occasionally gory, darkly cynical, over-the-top political slam-dunk, with comic portrayals of campaign tricks so dirty it's amazing that they're legal. (First printing of 125,000; film rights to Imagine Entertainment)"
A wickedly sleazy small-town mano a mano political thriller pits a naive yuppie lawyer against a homicidal cracker in a vicious southern Texas race for the US Congress. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

99 Percent Kill by Doug Richardson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 2015

"Will leave readers hungry for more from quick-witted, cool-headed Lucky."
In Richardson's (Blood Money, 2013, etc.) thriller, the first in a planned series, an LA sheriff's detective moonlighting as a PI scours the murky city streets for a runaway teenage girl.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAKING OF INTELLIGENCE by Ken Richardson
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 3, 2000

"Good and provocative insights here—enough to fuel debate, put genetic determinists in their place, and maybe get neuroscientists, psychologists, anthropologists, and linguists to talk to each other instead of plying their separate trades."
A provocative attack on most past and present theories of intelligence by British psychologist Richardson (Origins of Human Potential, not reviewed, etc.). Read full book review >