Search Results: "Joyce Block"


BOOK REVIEW

JAMES JOYCE by Gordon Bowker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 12, 2012

"The narrative path is sometimes obscured by a lush undergrowth of detail, but our guide is wise and the journey is wondrous."
The biographer of Orwell, Lowry and Durrell returns with a massively detailed narrative of the life of the author of Ulysses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Clearly presented theory, amply illustrated with lengthy case histories."
An elaborate presentation of the idea that people can get locked into fictional roles by their families. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOYCE IMAGES by Bob Cato
Released: Sept. 1, 1994

"In addition to photographs of Joyce (with his father, Nora, their children, Ezra Pound, Sylvia Beach, and others), there are drawings by various artists, including Brancusi and David Levine."
``Joyce was so little of a visual writer that he created characters one can hardly see,'' writes Anthony Burgess in his introduction to this array of images of James Joyce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 1, 1993

"Of interest, then, though Richard Ellmann's James Joyce remains the definitive life. (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs.)"
Assimilating masses of published and unpublished sources and hearsay, this ``popular'' biography, according to Costello (The Real World of Sherlock Holmes, 1991, etc.), is ``radically new'' in reconstructing Joyce's early years—the social, political, cultural, and domestic life; the family, friends, education, and economic circumstances that provided the prototypes and themes of his fiction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMES JOYCE by Richard Ellmann
Released: Oct. 22, 1959

"It is an important literary biography."
At the crossroads between the past and the present, but central to the intellectual temper of our time, James Joyce stands with Mann, Eliot, Yeats, Bergson and Proust. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JAMES JOYCE by Alfonso Zapico
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A solid account of the development of a writer not easy to encapsulate."
A graphic biography of the literary master. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GILDA JOYCE by Jennifer Allison
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"Offbeat and spine-chilling. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Irrepressible Gilda Joyce, Psychic Investigator, is at it again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOCK 11 by Piero degli Antoni
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Not by any means as emotionally draining as Sophie's Choice, but highly effective on its own terms."
When three prisoners escape from Auschwitz, 10 others are selected for execution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLOCK CITY by Robert Louis Stevenson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Not much to choose between the two interpretations, but it's a poem that every child should have an opportunity to know. (Picture book/poetry. 5-7)"
Echoing Ashley Wolff's 1988 approach to Stevenson's poetic tribute to the power of imagination, Kirk begins with neatly drawn scenes of a child in a playroom, assembling large wooden blocks into, "A kirk and a mill and a palace beside, / And a harbor as well where my vessels may ride." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BLOCK by Langston Hughes
POETRY
Released: Nov. 1, 1995

"Like Ntozake Shange's i live in music (1994, not reviewed), a continuous poem, illustrated by many of Bearden's works, this also shows readers how poetry and collage are not only related, but probably siblings. (Picture book/poetry. 4+)"
In a work published in conjunction with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the words and images of two Harlem Renaissance artists combine in a jazzy portrait of life on a Harlem block. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

READER'S BLOCK by David Markson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1996

"Nabokov speaks for Markson's aesthetic aims, while Shakespeare synopsizes the personal wistfulness and deep sorrow permeating this remarkable book."
From the erudite Markson (Wittgenstein's Mistress, 1990, not reviewed; etc.): a terse, modernist novel implying that history is over, the arts finished—yet offering extended, Beckett- like pleasures. ``Reader'' is the speaker here, and he speaks about ``Protagonist.'' Plot and event? ``Someone nodded hello to Reader on the street yesterday'' pretty much takes care of the action side of things. Read full book review >