Search Results: "Joyce Hansen"


BOOK REVIEW

THE HEART CALLS HOME by Joyce Hansen
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"Hansen deftly weaves real historical events into the novel, presenting a vivid account of a budding black settlement during Reconstruction. (Fiction. 12-14)"
More than a decade after the publication of the first books in this trilogy (Which Way Freedom, 1986; Out From This Place 1988), Hansen completes her story of Obi and Easter, two escaped slaves from South Carolina, who become separated during the Civil War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CAPTIVE by Joyce Hansen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

"Readable and perceptive. (Fiction. 10-12)"
Loosely basing her story on an early slave narrative, the author of Which Way Freedom? (1986) and other evocations of the African-American experience describes the trials and triumphs of an Ashanti chieftain's son who is sold into slavery, transported to postcolonial Massachusetts (where slavery is outlawed, but frequently tolerated), and finally set free by Paul Cuffe, the black shipbuilder and captain. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE TRUE FRIEND by Joyce Hansen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 15, 2001

"The story can stand on its own; newcomers to the series, though, may want to go back to the earlier books to see how Amir and Doris's friendship started. (Fiction. 8-12)"
A semi-epistolary novel in which two friends help each other through hard times with a long-distance correspondence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: Nov. 1, 1998

"A list of 'More Women of Hope' is appended. (bibliography) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
A gorgeous series of black-and-white photographic portraits that were part of a campaign to show people, especially young African-Americans, that "greatness looks like them" form the heart of this book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 1993

"Murky b&w photos and reproductions; notes; substantial bibliography; index. (Nonfiction. 12+)"
Brought together in what novelist Hansen (Which Way Freedom?, 1986) calls a ``great experiment,'' black troops in the Civil War faced not only enemy armies but their own side's vicious racism while proving their ability. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1998

From Hansen (Between Two Fires, 1993, etc.) and McGowan, a moving and enriching story of the discovery of an African burial ground located in lower Manhattan. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOME IS WITH OUR FAMILY by Joyce Hansen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 21, 2010

"Still, young readers will find the setting fascinating, and this will pair well with Tonya Bolden's nonfiction Maritcha: A Nineteenth-Century American Girl (2005). (Historical fiction. 9-12)"
It is 1855 in Manhattan and Maria Peters is 13 years old. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2003

"An important addition to library collections and classroom units. (foreword, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Silent stone faces on a tunnel wall in Syracuse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AESOP IN CALIFORNIA by Doug Hansen
adapted by Doug Hansen, illustrated by Doug Hansen
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 15, 2013

"This affectionate, glowing collection will be hard to resist. (Fables. 4-8)"
North to south, east to west, across mountain, valley, ocean and desert, California's flora and fauna illustrate adapted Aesopian fables. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALIFORNIA, THE MAGIC ISLAND by Doug Hansen
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"A must in the Golden State; teachers in other states could use it as inspiration for their own mythic histories. (Nonfiction. 6-12)"
In the early 16th century, a Spanish romantic adventure book told of Queen Calafia and her magical land, California, where she led black-skinned Amazon women of great courage and wisdom; Hansen plays on this trope in this illustrated tribute that combines history and myth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JACK OF HEARTS by Joseph Hansen
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"Familiar matters sensitively handled, with all the dated charm of a yellowing newspaper feature."
This prequel to the Lambda Awardwinning Living Upstairs (1993) finds 17-year-old Nathan Reed struggling on familiar ground- -with his family loyalties, his sexuality, and his vocation as a writer—back in 1941 L.A. Since his parents (a layabout father who dreams of beautiful music and works sporadically as a porter; a fortunetelling mother who's just been busted by the police) don't offer much in the way of nurture or support, it's only natural that Nathan would go looking elsewhere for a family: to Moon's CafÇ, where the staff of the Fair Oaks Junior College Monitor, overlooking his lower division status, take him to their collective bosom and press him to write a column for the paper; to the Harlequin theater, a fourth-floor loft where a cadre of Monitor regulars stage An Inspector Calls to critical acclaim and official harassment; and to a series of prospective lovers ranging from flirtatious ingenue Alex Morgan to disastrous Moon's waitress Sheila O'Hare to Fair Oaks instructor Kenneth Stone, an alleged Nazi spy, to mortuary organist Desmond Foley, whose weekend orgies are a town scandal, and to Nathan's old school friend Gene Woodhead, who returns from military school determined to pick up their sexual experiments where they'd left off. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MONSTERS OF ST. HELENA by Brooks Hansen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"Gloriously imagined—though with a rather low narrative temperature—with its spooky, dramatic detail giving it a feverish intensity."
An exotic locale, its fabled history, and the latter years of dethroned Napoleon Bonaparte are the colorful core materials of this intriguing third outing from Hansen (after Perlman's Ordeal, 1999, etc.). Read full book review >