Search Results: "Joyce Milton"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Lively, richly informative, deeply satisfying—a staple in Lindbergh studies. (Photos.)"
This judiciously empathic biography from Milton (The Yellow Kids, 1989), with its dazzling breadth of research, is the keystone of this season's Lindbergh-centered publications: Dorothy Herrmann's fine portrait of Anne Morrow Lindbergh (p. 1234); and Reeve Lindbergh's fictional familial tribute, The Names of the Mountains, (p. 1208), plus her poems and photos, in View from the Air (p. 1140), for the juvenile shelf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DINOSAUR DAYS by Joyce Milton
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 22, 2014

"Eye candy and intellectual nourishment alike for newly independent readers. (Informational early reader. 6-8)"
A classic informational early reader gets a substantial, long-overdue update. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRAMP by Joyce Milton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 19, 1996

"Rather, Milton presents a complex, insightful portrait of a man in whom genius and iniquity were inseparably combined. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
The little tramp takes some hard, muddy pratfalls in this masterful portrait of the artist as a swine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILD, WILD WOLVES by Joyce Milton
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1992

"A real bargain. (Nonfiction/Easy reader. 6-10)"
At ``Step 2'' in the useful ``Step into Reading'' series: an admirably clear, well-balanced presentation that centers on wolves' habits and pack structure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CALL ME GORGEOUS! by Giles Milton
ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"The endpapers hold full images of each of the 11 animals whose parts make up our winged, beaked, antlered and spiny Gorgeous. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The creature that inhabits these pages (the ending tag line is the title) is gorgeous indeed, and it is displayed in an inventive piece of bookmaking. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 30, 1990

A cogent survey of the historical roots of the fast ten amendments; how they were written "to strengthen the democratic standard of equality proclaimed as a self-evident truth in the Declaration of Independence"; and a brief exposition of each of their provisions, followed by more detailed accounts of how these have fared in the last 200 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Oct. 15, 1965

"As before, there are introductory comments, index, reading list."
This is the second in this chronologically arranged collection of source materials about the Negro in this country (the first volume was reviewed in 1964, p. 1018, J-332). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Dec. 13, 1975

"Strong, sensitive charcoal drawings by Harvey Dinnerstein."
Where most books on the immigrant experience tend to concentrate on the accomplishments of notable individuals, Meltzer consistently relates the course of American Jewry to its European roots. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 22, 1994

"Inevitably only a snapshot of Arab society, but valuable, still, for bringing an informed, intelligent, and remarkably unbiased judgment to a timely subject."
A thoughtful, objective effort ``to convey a sense—perhaps a feel—for Arab society today'' by New Yorker staff writer Viorst (Sands of Sorrow, 1987, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 16, 1972

"This dramatic, self-contained case study brings the researches of John K. Mahon (History of the Seminole War, 1967) and the earlier studies of Kenneth Porter on Seminole-black relationships before a popular audience."
The Seminole War is unique because it combined the goal of Indian removal with a campaign to recapture a large number of escaped slaves — many of whom had chosen a more benevolent bondage under masters from the Civilized Tribes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: Oct. 30, 1990

"An excellent source that also makes engrossing reading."
A cogent survey of the historical roots of the fast ten amendments; how they were written "to strengthen the democratic standard of equality proclaimed as a self-evident truth in the Declaration of Independence"; and a brief exposition of each of their provisions, followed by more detailed accounts of how these have fared in the last 200 years. Read full book review >