Search Results: "Jr. Kahn"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 23, 1991

"For the most part, however, a muddled miscellany. (Eight pages of b&w photos— not seen.)"
A scattershot profile of a wily septuagenarian who seems to have succeeded the late Armand Hammer as the Kremlin's favorite US businessman. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T CRY FOR ME, HOT PASTRAMI by Sharon Kahn
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Although the mystery's solution is perfunctory (the main clue is never completely explained), Kahn's attention to every outrageous detail—from the pink-on-pink ballroom to the rainbow tacos filled with sardine and frankfurter—makes this a voyage to remember."
Looks like stormy seas ahead for the hapless congregants of Temple Rita who've boarded the Bargain II for a cut-rate cruise to St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAX ME A BAGEL by Sharon Kahn
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Marissa Piesman goes west, with broad temple comedy substituting for Upper East Side wit. (Book-of-the-Month alternate selection)"
Next time you're in Eternal, Texas, be sure to stop in at The Hot Bagel (the only local competition, Kulberg's Deli, is from hunger). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOLD THE CREAM CHEESE, KILL THE LOX by Sharon Kahn
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 24, 2002

"Better as a travelogue than a puzzler."
Holy mackerel—not to mention the sturgeon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"An intoxicating panoply of legends and heroes, surely one of the most solid and delightful sporting histories of recent times. (16 pages b&w photos) (Author tour)"
With spellbinding results, a writer better known for his immortal baseball books crosses over—both to another sport, boxing, and to another literary genre, the sprawling social history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2006

"Generally speaking, a swinging read."
The artistic and commercial vicissitudes of a seminal jazz label, reconsidered. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RICKEY & ROBINSON by Roger Kahn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"A gripping, informative blend of memoir and cultural history."
The author of the classic The Boys of Summer (1972) and numerous other titles about the national pastime returns with a personal account of the fracturing of the racial barrier in Major League Baseball. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUT OF THE FRYING PAN, INTO THE CHOIR by Sharon Kahn
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 26, 2006

"As usual, Ruby, who prefers sleuthing to snuggling, spends more time with Essie Sue than with her poor sweetie."
Now that she's dumped newshound Ed Levinger, Ruby Rothman (Which Big Giver Stole the Chopped Liver?, 2004, etc.) is just about ready to settle down with local cop Paul Lundy until murder intrudes on their budding romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2011

"Paine would be proud, even if Kahn's small book likely reaches few readers beyond the already converted."
A well-intended, well-written effort to reclaim Thomas Paine from today's Tea Party. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 5, 1993

"While Kahn covers a lot of well-trampled ground here, he does so with an elegant authority that—without false sentiment or excessive nostalgia—puts certain of the diamond game's good old days in clear and compelling perspective. (Photographs—not seen)"
An agreeably digressive and anecdotal trip, with a perceptive guide, down a remarkable span in baseball's memory lane. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2003

"Hits it out of the park."
The commanding, silver-tongued Kahn (The Head Game, 2000, etc.), baseball chronicler extraordinaire, takes an enjoyably circuitous route to an ultimately dazzling account of the 1978 Yankees. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 4, 1997

"Simply put, this is a marvelous book. (photos) (Author tour)"
Kahn, dean of American sportswriters, shares his memories of a time when baseball players and writers were not the servants of different corporate masters and the game itself was not a virtual hostage to corporate or political interests. Read full book review >