Search Results: "Jr. Smith"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 24, 2012

"In the end, Houdini realizes that writing has changed him and altered his perspective on people and life. Readers will feel the same way. And just try to get kids not to make their own lists or attempt their own novels. (Fiction. 9-12)"
A middle-schooler writes a kids' novel; an author writes an engaging, amiable read—and, presto, a tale about a boy nicknamed Houdini turns out magical. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMITH by Leon Garfield
Released: Sept. 1, 1967

"More Hogarth than Cruikshank, this lacks the gusto of Devil in the Fog (1966) but readers who respond to the author will follow him here."
"Smith. 'unted, 'ounded, 'omeless, and part gin-sodder. Smith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGGIE SMITH by Michael Coveney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"An authoritative and perceptive portrait."
The illustrious career of "a great stage actress in both comedy and tragedy, and an international film star." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOD JR. by Dennis Cooper
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"A refreshing departure from the obsessive redundancy of its predecessors. Probably Cooper's best yet."
And now for something different from the master of homosexual punk sadomasochism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PATTI SMITH by Victor Bockris
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"But she and her many fans deserve better than this sometimes sensationalistic, second-hand account of her life."
Lou Reed and Keith Richards biographer Bockris offers the first full-length portrait of —70s rock icon Patti Smith, a woman whose charismatic live shows and uncompromising music earned her the moniker "The High Priestess of Punk." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA SMITH by Stephanie Barden
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2011

"Though the first-person narration sounds a little too close to the voice of Sara Pennypacker's Clementine, the richness of this new friendship and the gentle resolution will make readers hope for another installment. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Cinderella Smith cannot keep track of her shoes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH SMITH by Richard Lyman Bushman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2005

"More complete but less evenhanded than Robert Remini's Joseph Smith (2002); some readers may find parts of Bushman's narrative to be overly credulous."
Orthodox life of the decidedly unorthodox Joseph Smith, founder and prophet of Mormonism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEVIE SMITH by Frances Spalding
Released: May 29, 1989

From the author of Vanessa Bell: A Bloomsbury Portrait (1983), a comprehensive look at the life and literary work of Stevie Smith (1902-1971)—whose unorthodox, sometimes humorous, deceptively deep poetry won her acclaim throughout England and entree into intellectual society even as she continued to work as a secretary and live in an unfashionable London suburb. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WITTGENSTEIN JR by Lars Iyer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Pieced together from terse vignettes and enlivened with a liberal scattering of exclamation points, the novel teeters between exaggerated gloom and moments of true tenderness. Existential angst is rarely this entertaining."
An enigmatic young philosophy lecturer infuriates, intrigues and ultimately beguiles his Cambridge University students in this droll love story about logic and learning from Iyer (Philosophy/Newcastle Univ.; Exodus, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN SUGAR BABIES by Jr. Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"No candy is sweeter than these scrumptious babies in all of their delicious colors. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Poet-photographer, Smith (Tall Tales, p. 124) offers a delectable assortment of chubby-fisted, cherub-cheeked, African-American babies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RIMSHOTS by Jr. Smith
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"Smith closes with another tribute, to the African-American athletes, musicians, and artists who have meant the most to him. (Poetry. 8-11)"
Mixing poetry, memoir, short fiction, and photography, Smith pays a fast-break tribute to the pleasures and pains of b-ball, from being benched (" ‘Please Put Me In, Coach!!' "); to playing "Hot Like Fire," on the way to scoring 65 points; remembering "the time when my dad could no longer play one on one; or how a new kid, "Meek," proved himself on the court, once he was given a chance. Read full book review >