Search Results: "Juan Enriquez"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 15, 2005

"The presentation is odd—those with short attention spans may enjoy it most—but the argument is engaging."
An apocalyptic vision—at least for fans of America-as-sole-superpower—of a future in which the U.S. splinters into some version of Baja Canada, Jesusland and New New Mexico. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PET SHOP REVOLUTION by Ana Juan
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 2011

"An unsettling outing, with none of the dreamy lyricism that illuminated the artist's earlier Night Eater (2004). (Picture book. 6-8)"
This tale of a harsh pet-store owner who turns over a new leaf would be uplifting were it not so frightening. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1999

"An unusual look at the war and its consequences. (3 photos, not seen)"
paper 0-8263-1959-9 An introspective memoir in which the first-time author bluntly and self-critically examines his life before, during, and after his service in Vietnam. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 1, 2014

"An elegant, carefully delineated synthesis of the complicated, intertwined facets of the Arab uprisings."
A nuanced analysis of the factors leading to revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 5, 2016

"A solid overview for general readers."
Prizewinning journalist and Fox News political analyst Williams (Muzzled: The Assault on Honest Debate, 2011, etc.) identifies more than two dozen individuals who helped shape modern America.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENGAGING THE MUSLIM WORLD by Juan Cole
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 2009

"A well-reasoned, useful vision for Western-Muslim relations."
Want to neutralize terrorism? One step, suggests Cole (History/Univ. of Michigan; Napoleon's Egypt, 2007, etc.), is to stop using the term "Islamofascism." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 5, 2017

"Urban activists in other cities have much to learn from New York's experience, and González's book makes a good place to start."
A leading Latino journalist looks at the left-populist uprising that brought Bill de Blasio into the New York mayor's office and sharpened the nation's blue-red divide. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKATEFATE by Juan Felipe Herrera
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2011

"Only one thing is certain—readers expecting a skating account are in for a wipeout. (Poetry. 12 & up)"
Short diary entries and a series of confident, colorful poems introduce readers to Lucky, a wheelchair-bound former skater and drag racer who became paralyzed after a car accident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINNAMON GIRL by Juan Felipe Herrera
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"The Puerto Rican flavor of this lyrical, authentic novella will appeal to urban Latinas especially, but anyone touched by the events of September 11 will relate to Yolanda's story. (Fiction. YA)"
Yolanda's grasp on reality crumbles along with the World Trade Center after her beloved Uncle DJ is injured on September 11. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PABLO AND BIRDY by Alison McGhee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 22, 2017

"A quiet, memorable, fantastical tale beautifully complemented by Juan's illustrations. (Fabulism. 8-12)"
It has been 10 years since Pablo landed on the shores of the diverse community of Isla, with his lavender parrot, Birdy, in tow, to be adopted by Cuban-American Emmanuel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NUBIAN PRINCE by Juan Bonilla
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 7, 2006

"Not exactly effortlessly readable, but a skillful treatment of its unusual and tricky subject."
The international sex trade becomes the unlikely source of an ironic metamorphosis in the prizewinning Spanish newspaper columnist and author's 2003 novel (his first in English translation). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRAITOR'S EMBLEM by Juan Gómez-Jurado
Released: July 19, 2011

"The author tells a riveting love story, spoiled only by the unlikely incorporation of Freemasonry into the plot and a villain so evil he makes Hitler look like a pretty nice fellow."
Spanish author Gómez-Jurado's third outing (Moses Expedition, 2010, etc.) offers a redeeming love story set against the unlikely background of extreme violence in Nazi Germany. Read full book review >