Search Results: "Juan Felipe Herrera"


BOOK REVIEW

PORTRAITS OF HISPANIC AMERICAN HEROES by Juan Felipe Herrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2014

"A worthy introduction to some of the Hispanic-Americans who have left their marks on the country and culture through their commitment and dedication. (Biography. 8-12)"
Short and engaging biographies of 20 inspirational Hispanic-Americans from fields as varied as sports, arts, sciences, politics, and teaching. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKATEFATE by Juan Felipe Herrera
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2011

"Only one thing is certain—readers expecting a skating account are in for a wipeout. (Poetry. 12 & up)"
Short diary entries and a series of confident, colorful poems introduce readers to Lucky, a wheelchair-bound former skater and drag racer who became paralyzed after a car accident. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINNAMON GIRL by Juan Felipe Herrera
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"The Puerto Rican flavor of this lyrical, authentic novella will appeal to urban Latinas especially, but anyone touched by the events of September 11 will relate to Yolanda's story. (Fiction. YA)"
Yolanda's grasp on reality crumbles along with the World Trade Center after her beloved Uncle DJ is injured on September 11. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOWNTOWN BOY by Juan Felipe Herrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"A poignant and lyrical look into a transient existence that may still apply today. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Ten-year-old Juanito, son of migrant workers, is always the new kid. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FEATHERLESS/DESPLUMADO by Juan Felipe Herrera
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Both Spanish and English texts are direct, inviting, and expressive. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Like his pet bird Desplumado, featherless and with a drawn-in foot, Tomasito can't fly. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAUGHING OUT LOUD, I FLY by Juan Felipe Herrera
NONFICTION
Released: May 31, 1998

"This is poetry to read aloud, to read quickly, to understand more with the heart than with the head. (Poetry. 12-14)"
Citing Picasso's Hunk of Skin as his inspiration, Herrera (Calling the Doves/El Canto de las Palomas, 1995) offers 22 poems in facing English and Spanish versions, printed over Barbour's pale, floating figures of images from Mexican folk art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DUCK by Juan Wijngaard
illustrated by Juan Wijngaard
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1991

"Baby Animal Board Book'' series: Bear; Cat; Dog. (Picture book. 0-4)"
In a nicely inventive board book, a duckling has five experiences for the toddler to share and discuss: it nibbles a hole in a loaf of bread, swims in a wheelbarrow full of water, etc. The simple realistic illustrations are appealing and well drawn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUZZLED by Juan Williams
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"In the end, about the last thing the civil-discourse cause needs, namely more self-interested preaching to the choir."
A plea to make the world safe for bad-mouthing Muslims against the big bad PC police of the Far Left. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KILLING THE MANDARIN by Juan Alonso
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1995

"Swift and engaging right to the last."
Part political thriller, part treatise on the fragility of human interaction, this fine novel from the Argentinean-born Alonso (Althea, 1976, etc., not reviewed) offers a penetrating look into the struggle against oppression, both political and personal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEST WORST AMERICAN by Juan Martinez
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"An uneven but promising debut collection of short stories, some unique in their execution."
Twenty-four semiexistential short stories that have appeared in the likes of McSweeney's and Selected Shorts from Colombia-born writer Martinez. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Nonetheless, a scholarly, entertaining, and astonishing look at the enormous distance humankind has traveled in a historical instant. (400 b&w photos and illustrations, not seen) (Book-of-the- Month Club alternate selection/History Book Club main selection)"
An erudite and breathtaking, if sometimes vexing, review of how our waning millennium might seem from the perspective of ``some galactic museum of the future.'' An American or European reader of the 1990s will be forgiven for thinking of this millennium as one of Western preeminence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ESTHER'S STORY by Diane Wolkstein
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Elegant and enlightening. (pronunciation guide, notes) (Picture book. 7-11)"
Wolkstein (Step By Step, 1994, etc.) writes, in diary form, the story of Esther, the Jewish orphan who became queen of Persia and kept her identity a secret until her people were in danger of destruction at the hands of the prime minister, Haman. Read full book review >