Search Results: "Judith Byron Schachner"


BOOK REVIEW

YO, VIKINGS! by Judith Byron Schachner
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2001

"An author's note includes facts about Vikings, a bit about the background of the story (the authors' daughters really did procure a Viking ship from a Leif Ericsson organization), and a list of sources for further reading. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A seemingly outrageous fantasy comes at least partly true for imaginative Emma when she's able to purchase an actual Viking ship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILLY AND MAY by Judith Byron Schachner
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"This mostly unassuming tale delivers plenty of joy on Aunt May's—and Santa's—coattails. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The adventures of a young girl (who narrates), her mildly eccentric Aunt May, and May's rascally canary, Willy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MR. EMERSON'S COOK by Judith Byron Schachner
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"An informative afterword gives Emerson's and Annie's backgrounds. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Schachner (Willy and May, 1995, etc.) presents Ralph Waldo Emerson and his world through the eyes of his Irish cook (and the author's ancestor), Annie Burns. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GRANNYMAN by Judith Byron Schachner
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Schachner's artwork is tender and apt, capturing nuances in the postures struck, the cock of the head, the bend of the tail. (Picture book. 3-8)"
From Schachner (Mr. Emerson's Cook, 1998, etc.), a book tailored to cat lovers, as those best versed to appreciate the many subtle feline endearments caught in these pages. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOW THE CAT SWALLOWED THUNDER by Lloyd Alexander
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

An original pour quoi tale explaining why cats have the ability to purr, pleasing both themselves and their owners. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STAYING WITH GRANDMOTHER by Barbara Baker
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"A well-crafted story, gently suffused with affection. (Easy reader. 4-8)"
After Clair's parents kiss her good-bye, she feels sad; but she shares a hug with Grandmother (who looks sad, too) and goes upstairs to put her things in her mother's old room before helping to set the table (the macaroni ``is good. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUDITH by Nicholas Mosley
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Released: Feb. 14, 1990

Take the melodramatic core of reality from such earlier Mosley teasers as Accident and Serpent and you might end up with this high-toned, quicksilver mess about a delusional young actress named Judith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JIMMY, THE PICKPOCKET OF THE PALACE by Donna Jo Napoli
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1995

"With enough action, suspense, and humor for younger readers, this successful successor is certain to satisfy old fans and win new friends for the frog prince and his brood. (Fiction. 7-10)"
In this sequel to the charming Prince of the Pond (1992), Jimmy, frog-son of the frog prince, must save the pond from the evil Hag, who is working on a spell to dry it up so she can find her lost magic ring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYRON by Fiona MacCarthy
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 26, 2002

"Still, MacCarthy's exhaustive catalogue of Byron's every waking hour will be useful as source material for a future biographer seeking to craft a more interpretive—and shorter, and more interesting—study."
A densely detailed, lackluster life of the eminent poet, adventurer, and enfant terrible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYRON by Benita Eisler
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 1999

"Occasional local crimes of sensationalism, then, contribute to the singular virtue of this volume: it's the rare doorstop of a literary biography that's also a legitimate page-turner. (16 pages photos, not seen)"
This new life of the 19th-century's most notorious literary celebrity successfully revivifies the poet for our times—albeit not without applying a few shocks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BYRON by Robert M. Tucker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 14, 2006

"An intelligent, sometimes annoying, but ultimately exciting exploration of intolerance, superstition and the laws of nature and humankind."
Change-its ineluctability, the hopes and the fears it engenders-is the leitmotif of Tucker's coming-of-age drama. Read full book review >