Search Results: "Judith Gorog"


BOOK REVIEW

JUDITH by Nicholas Mosley
by
Released: Feb. 14, 1990

Take the melodramatic core of reality from such earlier Mosley teasers as Accident and Serpent and you might end up with this high-toned, quicksilver mess about a delusional young actress named Judith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINNING SCHEHERAZADE by Judith Gorog
ADVENTURE
Released: April 30, 1991

"Like Cohen's Seven Daughters and Seven Sons (1982), a delightfully creative extension of the Arabian story. (Fiction. 10+)"
An author noted for her startlingly original contemporary short stories spins several tales together in this appealing novel about the later history of the most famous storyteller of all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH by Judith Gorog
FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Still, these eerie tales will fascinate young readers. (Short stories. 10+)"
A strong premise and a dozen fine stories don't quite achieve the sum of their parts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN NOBODY'S HOME by Judith Gorog
FICTION
Released: May 1, 1996

"The rest of the tales are either weak or, in some cases, incomplete; the book's striking cover art will pull in the unsuspecting. (Fiction. 12+)"
Despite the subtitle—``Fifteen Baby-Sitting Tales of Terror''—most of the stories in this surprisingly uneven collection from Gorog (Please Do Not Touch, 1993, etc.) have a lot more baby-sitting than terror; one, ``The Three Brothers,'' is more silly than scary, and another, ``Sit,'' has nothing to do with baby-sitting. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ON MEETING WITCHES AT WELLS by Judith Gorog
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 18, 1991

"Appealing and well-told. (Fiction. 11-15)"
Illuminated by sudden twists and magical transformations, these linked stories from the author of Winning Scheherazade (p. 392) will have middle readers wondering if their schools and teachers aren't more than they seem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZILLA SASPARILLA AND THE MUD BABY by Judith Gorog
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1996

"Zilla's fears are such wild-eyed concoctions that the final scene, in which Cinnamon emerges safely from the river, has little impact. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Zilla loses a shoe into the clutchy goop that lines the Little Muddy River. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVES OF JUDITH by Meir Shalev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 1999

"Even so, the village mythologizing and the proverbs ('He couldn't say the names of wine, but his frying pan laughed and his knife danced in his hand—) will warm the hearts of many."
Shalev's third English translation (Esau, 1994) is set in post-WWII Palestine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 6, 2012

"A multifaceted journey for devotees of Vertigo to contemplate and enjoy."
Last time the world heard from Judy Barton she was tumbling out of the bell tower at Mission San Juan Bautista to her death, but it turns out the ethereal beauty of Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 masterpiece Vertigo has more to say. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 24, 2008

"A loving, stirring portrait of the American cultural mosaic."
Fearless foreign correspondent buys a fixer-upper in a different kind of war zone: West Harlem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLYING OUT OF BROOKLYN by Beverly Magid
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 27, 2007

"A heartfelt and ambitious novel that doesn't reach its potential."
A woman seeks to escape her humdrum life in World War II-era Brooklyn. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAD MAN DOCKING by Mary Daheim
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Aug. 1, 2005

"Sure, it's silly, and the outcome passes belief, but there are moments when the St. Georges' patter and wardrobe and love of martinis are absolutely intoxicating."
A spoof of Nick and Nora Charles, with a komondor standing in for Asta and enough martinis to pickle all three livers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I HAVE A FRIEND by Judith Inglese
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2014

"Aims high but misses. (Picture book. 5-7)"
Staid pictures make a poor match for a child's free-flying introduction to an imaginary friend. Read full book review >