Search Results: "Judith Hermann"


BOOK REVIEW

JUDITH by Nicholas Mosley
by
Released: Feb. 14, 1990

Take the melodramatic core of reality from such earlier Mosley teasers as Accident and Serpent and you might end up with this high-toned, quicksilver mess about a delusional young actress named Judith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FAIRY TALES OF HERMANN HESSE by Hermann Hesse
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 1995

"Minor work from a more-or-less major writer, and a lot more fun than much of Hesse's major fiction."
Some pleasant surprises are displayedalong with some dreary redundanciesin this nevertheless welcome first English translation of the German writer's fables and parables. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUMMERHOUSE, LATER by Judith Hermann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2002

"Stories, yes, but without characters a reader can care about, they remain surface only."
The ten stories in Hermann's debut are said to have been a great success at home (Hermann is a Berliner), but to the Yankee ear they seem to consist, for the most part, of youth, pose, and attitude. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOVES OF JUDITH by Meir Shalev
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 1999

"Even so, the village mythologizing and the proverbs ('He couldn't say the names of wine, but his frying pan laughed and his knife danced in his hand—) will warm the hearts of many."
Shalev's third English translation (Esau, 1994) is set in post-WWII Palestine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 6, 2012

"A multifaceted journey for devotees of Vertigo to contemplate and enjoy."
Last time the world heard from Judy Barton she was tumbling out of the bell tower at Mission San Juan Bautista to her death, but it turns out the ethereal beauty of Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 masterpiece Vertigo has more to say. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1991

"An admirable work of scholarship, well organized and intelligently annotated, and an indispensable guide to any future studies of Hesse. (Photographs—not seen.)"
The first English edition of Hesse's letters, edited and introduced by the Princeton scholar (Dean of the Graduate School) whose previous studies (The Novels of Herman Hesse, 1965; Herman Hesse, 1966—not reviewed) have established him as a preeminent authority on Hesse's life and work. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURE FOR GRIEF by Nellie Hermann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"Profound, poetic and original. Hermann is a young author to watch."
A subtle, elegiac coming-of-age novel about catastrophe, grief and the persistence of everyday life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SEASON OF MIGRATION by Nellie Hermann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 6, 2015

"Finely wrought fiction eschewing the usual clichés about artistic inspiration in favor of deeper, more organic understanding."
Hermann follows up her well-received debut (The Cure for Grief, 2008) with a sensitive novel about a crucial turning point in the life of Vincent van Gogh.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1994

"Inspiring and informative, this book fills large gaps in what we know about resistance in the concentration camps."
The first significant study of concentration camp resistance to focus on the political dynamics of inmates of varying nationalities and classifications. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CLASS by Hermann Ungar
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 2004

"Like a glimpse three-quarters of a century back into a world that has wholly vanished: formal, constrained, class-ridden, quintessentially European. Fascinating."
The first English translation of Czech author Ungar's extremely interesting second novel, published in 1927, preceding the better-known The Maimed (1928, 2002). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HUGO'S BABY BROTHER by Hermann Moers
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1992

"Wilko's glowing double spreads, rendered in pastels, are lovely—rich color; evanescent, lightly sketched background details; and the delightful lions, who express subtle human emotion with every whisker, leap, and glance. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sibling rivalry, lion-style: Hugo is not prepared to be supplanted, but his mother is cheerfully firm and his dad unsympathetic when he decides to ``do something really terrible''—like reaching for a poisonous snake; still, there are lions his own age to play with, and in the end he makes friends with little Sasha and even rescues him from an elephant. Read full book review >