Search Results: "Judy Sue Goodwin Sturges"


BOOK REVIEW

CONSTRUCTION KITTIES by Judy Sue Goodwin Sturges
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"A good addition to construction-machine collections everywhere. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Who's ready for a day of work in the sun? Construction Kitties! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIDDEN SPIRITS by Sue Kassirer
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 1996

"Subtleties in shading and color choice enhance the optical illusions in the prints, which are so alluring that some readers will skip the text entirely. (Picture book/nonfiction. 8+)"
Dramatic scratchboard paintings by a wildlife artist celebrate animals and landscapes of the western and southwestern US and invite viewers to hunt for elusive images that act as ``reminders of the uniqueness and beauty of Native American culture.'' Each spread opens with a description of what is happening in the double-page spread (e.g., a grizzly is swimming) and what (or who) else can be spotted in the painting (two people are among the boulders around the bathing pool). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANGEL'S GATE by p.g. sturges
Released: Feb. 26, 2013

"Sturges (The Tribulations of the Shortcut Man, 2012, etc.) piles on the chuckles, throws in a host of extreme characters and provides readers with nonstop action. And he does so with enough finesse to compensate for the novel's weaknesses."
The Shortcut Man is back once more, and he quickly becomes mired in more than one case of sex, drugs, blackmail and—what else?—murder. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE RED HEN (MAKES A PIZZA) by Philemon Sturges
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"I will.'(Picture book/folklore. 5-7)"
In the best refashioning of a classic folktale since Eugene Trivizas's Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig (1993), Sturges hilariously extends and modernizes the original. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TRIBULATIONS OF SHORTCUT MAN by P.G. Sturges
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"Just as funny as Dick's debut (Shortcut Man, 2011), but more consistently plotted in the manner of all your favorite criminal zanies."
A marital swindle plunges Dick Henry, the man who slices through Gordian knots for a living, into a stew of other schemers, lots of them witless, some of them real sharpies, most of them with just as many boundary issues as him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 10, 2000

"An all-too-short, manylayered tale that succeeds as a roots memoir, detective story, and revelation of tragically tangled bloodlines."
An American ethnographer's journal of a 1930 sojourn with a band of renegade Apaches living in Mexico's Sierra Madre mountains, published now for the first time, along with his son's account of travels in his father's footsteps. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAGGERS by Philemon Sturges
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2005

"The cats may come out on top this time, but just wait. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Readers of any age who have wondered why dogs sniff each others' rear ends upon meeting may not credit Sturges' rhymed, not-quite-serious explanation, but will be nonetheless entertained by it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE AMERICAN HEIRESS by Daisy Goodwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 21, 2011

"Superior entertainment."
A shrewd, spirited historical romance with flavors of Edith Wharton, Daphne du Maurier, Jane Austen, Upstairs, Downstairs and a dash of People magazine that charts a bumpy marriage of New World money and Old World tradition. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BREAKING HER FALL by Stephen Goodwin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2003

"Serious, contemplative, and also slow-moving third from Goodwin (The Blood of Paradise, 1979, etc.)."
A contemporary family drama, filled with angst and redemption. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 1, 2012

"A fast-paced, multilayered story of seaside murders separated by three centuries."
Two women murdered in Marblehead, Massachusetts, 301 years apart—one in 1690 and the other in 1991—would seem to have nothing in common, but Goodwin ties both together in her novella. Read full book review >