Search Results: "Julia Cunningham"


BOOK REVIEW

COME TO THE EDGE by Julia Cunningham
Released: March 1, 1977

"Yet the dichotomy between possessiveness and the bonds of trust, as acted out by the sniveling miser Gant and Paynter (last seen letting Gravel draw wings around a pair of shoes he's sketched for an ad) seems to inspire this author's best efforts; even her constricted solipsistic manner is oddly complementary to the theme."
The gray vacuum that is Gravel Winter's soul will remind you of the aloof presence of Gilly in Dorp Dead, but here it is kindness more than cruelty which threatens the integrity of a boy's alienation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BURNISH ME BRIGHT by Julia Cunningham
Released: May 11, 1970

"As it might if the spontaneity of gesture weren't crushed by the author's heavy hand."
The empathy between a once-celebrated mime and a victimized young mute is so inevitable that it goes without saying—certainly without saying "How he hated to leave this new being, this young tree of such talent he shone with it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLF ROLAND by Julia Cunningham
Released: March 12, 1983

"But like other Cunningham stories of medieval travels, orphans, and the like, it has a frozen, sanctimonious quality."
Cunningham's latest medieval allegory concerns Tegonec, who makes his living with his donkey cart, and the talking wolf who materializes by the roadside and devours his donkey, Fanfare. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINGS OF THE MORNING by Julia Cunningham
Released: March 1, 1971

"And, coupled with the poeticizing, ineffectual by comparison with the creative simplicity of the Brown-Charlip Dead Bird."
Adumbrated in words that are not childlike is an experience unlike that of most children — who, finding an inert bird by the roadside, assume it to be hurt or dead and react fearfully or protectively according to their nature. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TREASURE IS THE ROSE by Julia Cunningham
Released: Oct. 15, 1973

"Cunningham's heavy romanticism is a little easier to take than the drippy sentimentality of her recent Tallow stories, but as usual her talent for simulating a trance exceeds her sensibility, so that from the opening disclaimer that 'To tell about Ariane is to try to grow a rose on paper without the touch of sun and moon, rain and snow that make it real and growing,' she comes as dose to parody as she does to sharing a vision."
In a crumbling 11th century castle hedged with roses, the power of a young widow's gentleness tames a trio of thugs and repels a haughty baron. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAYBE, A MOLE by Julia Cunningham
Released: Nov. 18, 1974

"Suck is the nature of the cozy, unilluminating glow that Cunningham has been casting from Candle Tales (1964) to The Treasure Is the Rose (1973) — despite more than a hint of stronger fires in Dorp Dead."
This is another of Cunningham's sentimental stories told in that half-cute, half-hushed manner that reeks with serf-importance and the expectation of an awed reception. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONION JOURNEY by Julia Cunningham
Released: Oct. 1, 1967

"The combination of overt moralizing, overextended symbolism and wispy texture is likely to draw a blank from most children though adults may well find it charming."
Perhaps this very brief, very explicit allegory of the love between Gilly and his grandmother is Julia Cunningham's answer to critics of Derp Dead: it's no more than a tender Christmas greeting otherwise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CANDLE TALES by Julia Cunningham
Released: Feb. 19, 1964

"The author's way with words was established in Macaroon and this will enhance her deserved reputation for excellence, just as the illustrator's superbly decorative work here enhances ers."
Mr. Minnikin, the candlemaker, allowed a mouse, a dog, a cat, a pig, a squirrel and a gull to live in the shed behind his house. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAR IN THE DAY by Julia Cunningham
Released: April 15, 1972

"Even those who basked in the self-consciously poetical glow of Burnish Me Bright will find Tallow pretty drippy."
The mute French mime of Burnish Me Bright (1970) joins up with a tawdry five-man Irish circus for an even more sentimental performance than the one that ended in expulsion from his native village. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 14, 1960

"This he does, with all the accompanying struggles between carnal and spiritual satisfaction in a story which is at once piquant and moving."
Francois was by nationality, French, and by species a fox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLIGHT OF THE SPARROW by Julia Cunningham
Released: Oct. 1, 1981

"Cunningham has curbed her excessive poeticizing here, but her imagination remains aquiver with maudlin frissons."
Once again in this story of love among the waifs of Paris, Cunningham deals in pathos and sentimental stereotype. Read full book review >