Search Results: "Julian Evans"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"We'd be the losers, though, for his mordant, Dantean travelogue offers a number of grotesque, cleverly crafted delights."
Fast on the heels of Paul Theroux's best-selling The Happy Isles of Oceania (p. 525) comes this equally polished but far more jaded view of Pacifica by English journalist Evans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOUNDLING BOY by Michel Déon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 15, 2014

"Mature, relaxed storytelling, balancing human nature with historical inevitability; a pleasure for traditionalists generally and Francophiles in particular."
Only the second novel by this distinguished French writer to be translated into English: An affectionate slice of provincial life captures the coming of age of a 20th-century soul. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 17, 2001

"Riveting portraits of the spawn of evil."
Employing a novel, gripping concept, German journalist Stephen Lebert re-interviews the children of prominent Nazis, and mixes the material with interviews conducted in 1959 by his journalist father, Norbert Lebert. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE MATADOR by Julian Hector
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 15, 2008

"The contrasts and similarities between the Little Matador and his 20th-century counterpart Ferdinand would make for an interesting storytime. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A family of renowned bullfighters raises a son to carry on their glory in the ring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLOPPY WANTS A HUG by Sean Julian
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Short, simple, sweet—and more than likely to spur some similarly slobbery affection between parent and child. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Dewdrop the fairy is willing to give every forest creature a hug—except for Sloppy the tree dragon. What has Sloppy done? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIGH ART LITE by Julian Stallabrass
Released: Jan. 6, 2000

"Nimbly written and bolstered by a constellation of critical and cultural referents: a balanced, engrossing, historically framed examination of this latest avant-garde, so startling yet so oddly familiar. (50 color and b&w illustrations)"
A full-throated attack on the —new British art,— a movement obsessed with commerce and cults of the personal, that manages to be smarter and more far-reaching than its hyped, hopped-up subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VERY ENGLISH AGENT by Julian Rathbone
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 2004

"Over-the-top, enjoyably R-rated entertainment from an old pro who appears to be having the time of his life."
The latest historical romp from veteran thriller/detective storywriter Rathbone (Kings of Albion, 2002, etc.) jauntily exposes the underside of 19th-century parliamentary "reform." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DIAMOND MASK by Julian May
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 28, 1994

"Again patchy and irritatingly inconclusive; but May handles both the psychic complications and the family interactions with pleasing skill, and the upshot is another probable crowd-pleaser- -though no place for newcomers to start."
Book two of May's Galactic Milieu trilogy (Jack the Bodiless, 1991) is a leisurely account of the events that led up to the Metapsychic Rebellion of 2083 and precipitated the action of May's previous tetralogy, the Saga of Pliocene Exile. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN by Julian Rathbone
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Rathbone (Sand Blind, 1994, etc.) keeps everything stylishly knowing, jaundiced, and off-kilter until the final movement, which smacks just a bit too much of Quentin Tarantino shootouts."
Nobody but the fledgling Regional Department for Environmental Crime (DUK in German) cares about Roger Vesper, an inoffensive lab technician at the Regional Cancer Hospital who may be the key to cracking a case involving some missing experimental antibiotics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FELICITY'S GATE by Julian Cole
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 10, 2011

"An offbeat novel from a promising author who hasn't quite found his niche."
Two brothers work distinctly at cross-purposes to solve the murder of a York artist in journalist Cole's latest (The Amateur Historian, 2010). Read full book review >