Search Results: "Julian Semilian"


BOOK REVIEW

NOSTALGIA by Mircea Cartarescu
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 29, 2005

"Cartarescu's phantasmagorical world is similar to Dalí's dreamscapes, but long blocks of prose with minimal breaks make it hard to enter."
A surrealist landscape stands revealed in this 1989 work by one of Romania's leading novelists and poets; this is the author's U.S. debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE MATADOR by Julian Hector
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 15, 2008

"The contrasts and similarities between the Little Matador and his 20th-century counterpart Ferdinand would make for an interesting storytime. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A family of renowned bullfighters raises a son to carry on their glory in the ring. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SLOPPY WANTS A HUG by Sean Julian
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Short, simple, sweet—and more than likely to spur some similarly slobbery affection between parent and child. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Dewdrop the fairy is willing to give every forest creature a hug—except for Sloppy the tree dragon. What has Sloppy done? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN by Julian Rathbone
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Rathbone (Sand Blind, 1994, etc.) keeps everything stylishly knowing, jaundiced, and off-kilter until the final movement, which smacks just a bit too much of Quentin Tarantino shootouts."
Nobody but the fledgling Regional Department for Environmental Crime (DUK in German) cares about Roger Vesper, an inoffensive lab technician at the Regional Cancer Hospital who may be the key to cracking a case involving some missing experimental antibiotics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIGH ART LITE by Julian Stallabrass
Released: Jan. 6, 2000

"Nimbly written and bolstered by a constellation of critical and cultural referents: a balanced, engrossing, historically framed examination of this latest avant-garde, so startling yet so oddly familiar. (50 color and b&w illustrations)"
A full-throated attack on the —new British art,— a movement obsessed with commerce and cults of the personal, that manages to be smarter and more far-reaching than its hyped, hopped-up subject. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUNO & JULIET by Julian Gough
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 17, 2001

"Irish newcomer Gough deftly captures the twins' youthful awe and giddy excitement during their freshman year, and though the plot ambles along fairly conventional paths, its course is stylistically nimble, intellectually unburdensome, and eminently companionable."
A smartly written, pleasantly conceived Irish variation on the girl-goes-to-college-and-comes-of-age story in which small-town twins learn to adore literature and the arts, fall in love, and through loss discover deeper truths. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"We'd be the losers, though, for his mordant, Dantean travelogue offers a number of grotesque, cleverly crafted delights."
Fast on the heels of Paul Theroux's best-selling The Happy Isles of Oceania (p. 525) comes this equally polished but far more jaded view of Pacifica by English journalist Evans. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMETHING TO DECLARE by Julian Barnes
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 7, 2002

"Still, those planning a trip to the Louvre or a browsing tour through the stacks devoted to la belle France will find Barnes's essays to be a worthy companion."
A most un-English embrace of all (well, most) things French by the noted English novelist (Love, Etc., 2001, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THROUGH THE WINDOW by Julian Barnes
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 20, 2012

"Not every piece will connect with every reader, but Barnes is a fine literary companion."
The focus on books and literature makes this more cohesive than the usual collection of journalistic miscellany. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARIS by Julian Green
NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"A series of love notes, subtle and charming."
Nineteen evocations of the City of Light, by the American novelist/essayist/playwright whom Jacques Maritain called ``the greatest French writer of our time.'' Born in Paris of American parents in 1900, Green (The Other One, 1973, etc.) has spent most of his life in the French capital; here, he's celebrating the spirit of the city rather than providing a guide to its more familiar monuments and attractions. Read full book review >