Search Results: "Juliet Y. Mark"


BOOK REVIEW

UNFALLEN by Juliet Y. Mark
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"A promising, if slightly overstuffed, start to an ambitious fantasy series."
This debut fantasy novel asks: What if Adam refused the apple, and only Eve was ejected from the Garden of Eden? Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MARK SUNDEEN
by Megan Labrise

Writing about the simple life proved anything but for immersive journalist Mark Sundeen.

His original manuscript—an unadorned account of three couples who, in varying ways, have opted out of everyday American consumerism—was accepted and revised when he withdrew it from publisher Riverhead Books.

“I had a close friend read it, call me, and say, I stopped reading at page 175 ...


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BLOG POST

NOTHING LIKE APRIL OR PARIS
by Bobbi Dumas

Yay! April’s here!

There’s something special about April, with its exuberant celebration of spring—flowers blooming, trees blossoming, leaves unfurling, reaching for the sun.

I can appreciate that feeling, and love that this is the time of year when we can step outside and tilt our faces up to the sky and feel the warmth of the season on our skin ...


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BLOG POST

WHEN CHAOS REIGNS
by Julie Danielson

As I’ve said many times here at Kirkus, I love to follow picture book imports, and one thing I appreciate about them is the amount of chaos they’re willing to let in. If you live in America and primarily write about picture books from this country, as I do, along comes an import, and it’s often an altogether different beast ...


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BOOK REVIEW

A-MAZE-ING MINOTAUR by Juliet Rix
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2014

"A middling treatment all around. (Picture book/myth. 6-9)"
With the help of a beautiful princess, Theseus solves the mystery of the Labyrinth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"Proper fantasy, balanced between epic and personal; this promises to be an engrossing series, with intimations of bigger things ahead. (Historical fantasy. 13 & up)"
In an alternate ancient British Isles, an intrepid heroine may save the kingdom from its wicked ruler. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WORDSWORTH by Juliet Barker
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 2005

"Exhaustive and intimately connected to the English landscape, but lacking the big picture."
English biographer Barker (The Brontës, 1995) sifts tediously and joylessly through the ponderous life of the great nature poet, friend to Coleridge and later laureate of England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 14, 2011

"A general but solid primer on the state of sharks today and a plea for their protection."
Washington Post environmental reporter Eilperin (Fight Club Politics: How Partisanship is Poisoning the House of Representatives, 2006) travels the globe to explore the complex relationship between sharks and humans, issuing a passionate call for the protection of these diverse and majestic creatures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILDWOOD DANCING by Juliet Marillier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 23, 2007

"However, the consuming gothic love of Tati and Sorrow, and Jena's burdened but intoxicating relationship with her own slow-to-show true love, will sweep romance fans away. (author's note, glossary, pronunciation guide) (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Two Grimm's tales, a Transylvanian forest and purple prose combine in an entrancing rush of romance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INTRODUCING PICASSO by Juliet Heslewood
BIOGRAPHY
Released: May 1, 1993

"Chronology; index. (Nonfiction. 8+)"
An attractive brief survey, focusing on the most significant of Picasso's styles, with a scattering of b&w photos and some fine color reproductions of his work (mostly paintings) plus works of art that influenced him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"While only true believers will follow Mitchell in the orthodox canon of complexes, cathexes, and dream interpretations, her arguments for reclaiming hysteria for both sexes are persuasive."
Psychoanalyst Mitchell makes a good case for the feminization of hysteria and its later decline and fall as a category of mental illness. Read full book review >