Search Results: "Justin Cronin"


BOOK REVIEW

THE PASSAGE by Justin Cronin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 8, 2010

"The young girl as heroine and role model is a nice touch. Otherwise a pretty ordinary production, with little that hasn't been seen before."
Literary author Cronin (Mary and O'Neil, 2001, etc.) turns in an apocalyptic thriller in the spirit of Stephen King or Michael Crichton. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUMMER GUEST by Justin Cronin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 6, 2004

"Pleasant people in a pleasant setting, but without the credibility and edge to engage."
Cronin's graceful second (after Mary and O'Neil, 2001) is well executed but uncompelling as it tells of the hold a lakeside Maine camp has on three generations of a family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CITY OF MIRRORS by Justin Cronin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 24, 2016

"Of interest to fans who have followed the story through the first two books, but a bumpy ride without that background."
What are you going to do after vanquishing the virals? Why, properly inoculated, refound civilization, of course. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARY AND O’NEIL by Justin Cronin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 6, 2001

"A quiet debut, its very understatement giving rise to its poignancy and strength."
With subtlety and grace, a first novel—actually a series of eight linked, chronologically arranged stories—illuminates momentous if commonplace events in the lives of a modern New England family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TWELVE by Justin Cronin
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"A viral spaghetti Western; it's not Sergio Leone—or, for that matter, Michael Crichton—but it's a satisfying confection."
Cronin continues the post-apocalyptic—or, better, post-viral—saga launched with 2010's The Passage. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

FILMMAKERS BET BIG ON SCIENCE FICTION NOVELS
by John DeNardo

It's no secret that film and television studios can be successful producing science fiction films and shows. What may be surprising is that you can enjoy the next big SciFi blockbuster even before it hits screens. Here's a roundup of the latest science fiction books that have jumped aboard the adaptation train…

 

The Passage by Justin Cronin ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST HOUSE by B.B. Cronin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 27, 2016

"A clever, irresistible, visually engaging search-and-find exercise. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Before Grandad can take his two grandchildren to the park, he needs their help to find various personal items he's lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LOST PICNIC by B.B. Cronin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2017

"A trippy addition to the search-and-find genre. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Granddad and his grandchildren will need plenty of help to recover all the goodies that fall out of their basket on the way to the picnic grounds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CYCLONE by Doreen Cronin
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 16, 2017

"A sensitive exploration of the high costs of failing to really connect with those around us. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Cronin, famous for solving cow communication problems with a typewriter in Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type (2000) and sequels, offers her debut middle-grade novel illuminating human communication problems. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PARIS ON THE EVE by Vincent Cronin
NON-FICTION
Released: April 18, 1991

"Still: an engrossingly vivid, immediate, and informed attempt to find a unified view of a culture that was made up of eccentrics, idiosyncrasy, diversity, and alienation."
Through anecdotes and capsule biographies of painters, writers, musicians, scientists, and intellectuals, Cronin (The View from Planet Earth, 1981; Catherine, Empress of All the Russias, 1978, etc.) accounts for that dazzling but doomed culture of Paris during the ``Belle Epoque,'' the period between the Great Exhibition of 1900 and WWI. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERYONE LOVES YOU BACK by Louie Cronin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 21, 2016

"A funny, atmospheric exploration of midlife evolution."
A radio engineer finds his life in Cambridge transformed thanks to tree huggers, job politics, and more in this debut novel. Read full book review >