Search Results: "Justine Fontes"


BOOK REVIEW

JUSTINE by Iben Mondrup
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 15, 2016

"A dark, ultimately frustrating tale of an enfant terrible wannabe."
Danish author Mondrup (Godhavn, 2014) exposes the underbelly of the contemporary Danish art scene in this novel about a young artist in crisis. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUSTINE by Alice Thompson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1998

"For those, only, who like their mind- and gender-teasers in —novel— form."
Scottish writer Thompson's second outing is her first here—and while some will groan at its jejune, vapid, imitative clunkiness, others will be smitten by its psycho-feminist puzzlings and probings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BENITO RUNS by Justine Fontes
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: March 1, 2011

"For reluctant readers and fans of the Bluford High series. (Fiction. 12-14)"
Each book in the high-interest/low-reading-level Surviving Southside series is narrated by a different student at Texas' racially diverse Southside High School. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK MEETS WHITE by Justine Fontes
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"This color study will definitely get—and survive—repeat visits. (Picture book. 3-5)"
Plainly intended as a follow-up to the several board-book introductions to black and white, not to mention Little Blue and Little Yellow, this pairs Black ("dark as night, cool, mysterious") with White ("bright, clean, plain as day"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUSTINE MCKEEN by Sigmund Brouwer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"While brief paperbacks for newly independent readers are too numerous to count, this one is slightly funnier and fresher than most. (Fiction. 7-9)"
Inventive and intrepid Justine McKeen, most likely a grade schooler, finds amusing ways to make classmates and community members more environmentally conscious. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE REAL JUSTINE by Stephen Amidon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"While there are a few genuine surprises along the way, most of Amidon's (Security, 2009, etc.) twists are telegraphed so far in advance that it's a wonder the characters don't see them coming."
A few nights of passion ignite a man's obsession for a mysterious woman in this tale of uncertain identities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMS OF THE CENTAUR by Montserrat Fontes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 15, 1996

"Despite some longueurs, then: an effective, often exciting piece of storytelling with a powerful central female character."
Fontes returns to the Durcal family, introduced in her 1990 debut, First Confession. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST CONFESSION by Montserrat Fontes
Released: Jan. 21, 1990

Two privileged children come of age when they venture into dangerous territory in a small Mexican border town: a striking debut novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WONDER HOUSE by Justine Hardy
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 9, 2006

"Hardy's lack of novelistic skill hobbles her attempt to pull together the personal and the political, the past and the present."
Kashmir is the setting for this messy first novel by a British nonfiction author (Bollywood Boy, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 10, 2002

"A lament that at certain moments, for its intensity, can break your heart."
Picardie's (Music Man, 1990) search for contact with her sister, who died from breast cancer in 1997, has both lightness and ache, the melancholy of being condemned to live on after the death of one so loved, yet a willingness to explore "what lies beyond the edge of the expected." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VERY PERSONAL COMPUTER by Justine Rendal
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 30, 1995

"The story is marred by sheaves of unanswered questions and dangling plot threads, but readers will love Conner: part homework machine, part therapist, part best friend, wholly touched by magic. (Fiction. 11-15)"
A helpful computer program gets a depressed eighth grader over a tough spot in this rough-hewn, unabashed fantasy. Read full book review >