Search Results: "Karel Capek"


BOOK REVIEW

TALES FROM TWO POCKETS by Karel Capek
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1994

Newly translated stories by noted Czech author apek (1890- 1938) use the mystery form to explore such issues as fate, mortality, and the nature of justice. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CROSS ROADS by Karel Capek
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2002

"This replete volume offers further proof, if any were needed, of a still-underrated great writer's distinctive versatility, creative energy, and humanity."
Catbird's latest offering (the seventh so far) of the work of the eminent Czech writer (1890-1938) presents the full contents of two early story collections. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LITTLE GIRL WHO COULD FLY by Karel Capek
by Karel Capek, adapted and illustrated by Elite-Avni-Sharon, developed by Yellow Pixie
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2012

"It's an adaptation that manages a tricky balance between heartfelt and hokey within an app that has a distinctive look and feel. (iPad storybook app. 3-7)"
A softened-up adaptation of Czech writer Capek's short story, "The Man Who Knew How to Fly," this cheerily illustrated app still manages to convey a sense of what's lost when we leave childhood. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

APOCRYPHAL TALES by Karel Capek
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1997

"Jesus' miracle of the loaves and fishes are only two of the deadpan surprises to be found in an unfailingly delightful book."
Apocryphal Tales ($13.95 paperback original; June 15, 1997; 199 pp.; 0-945774-34-6): Though not enough readers in the English-speaking world know it, the great Czech writer (18901938) rivals D.H. Lawrence and even arguably Chekhov for the amount of work of sustained excellence produced during a tragically brief lifetime. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUSIC AND THE ARTS
Released: May 3, 1995

"Readers will appreciate the optical effects, and the glossary and index make this useful for research. (Nonfiction. 10+)"
A sturdy exploration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAKE LEAVE AND GO by Karel Schoeman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 15, 1993

"Palpably dark and apocalyptic evocations of GîtterdÑmmerung and creative despair, though the themes are long in the working, and never quite live up to their implied promise."
A dark winter of the spirit in a South African setting—and limned in sometimes too exquisite prose—by the author of Another Country (1992). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANOTHER COUNTRY by Karel Schoeman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A distinguished debut."
South African Schoeman makes his American debut with a novel of high purpose—one that movingly explores that other country that for his ailing hero is both Africa and death. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO’S BEEN HERE? by Fran Hodgkins
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2008

"A Guide to Nature's Footprints (2008). (Picture book. 3-7)"
Willy the dog loves winter, when he can run through town and up into the woods to see what other sorts of animals are about. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ENIGMA OF JAPANESE POWER by Karel van Wolferen
Released: April 11, 1989

By a Dutch correspondent with 20 years in Japan, this book is the latest in a long tradition of attempts to explain that country—to Americans in particular. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THIS LIFE by Karel Schoeman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 12, 2015

"For all that Schoeman's novel summons up grand themes, its handling of them is subtle and sometimes mysterious, arriving at its most powerful moments unpredictably and honestly."
In this decades-spanning novel, an Afrikaner woman looks back at her life and the slow evolution of her family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A FATHER’S AFFAIR by Karel Van Loon
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 21, 2003

"A well-constructed if somewhat dispiriting, perhaps even nihilistic, tale."
The American debut of Dutch novelist Van Loon is a kind of domestic thriller about a young father who learns that his dead wife's son is not his child. Read full book review >