Search Results: "Karen Lynn William"


BOOK REVIEW

APPLEBAUM'S GARAGE by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 18, 1993

"It also doesn't hurt if both parties appreciate great junk. (Fiction. 8-11)"
In a book for older children, the author of Galimoto (1990) again explores the joys of creating from junk. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A REAL CHRISTMAS THIS YEAR by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 23, 1995

"The dialogue is occasionally contrived around a need to convey information, but this remains a compelling novel about the real meaning of Christmas. (Fiction. 9-13)"
Megan's little brother, Kevin, has multiple handicaps and threw destructive, impenetrable tantrums until he got glasses and a hearing aid. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"It may be difficult for readers to believe that the adults around Julie are unaware of her problems; her skills are too exceptionally minimal to go unnoticed. (Fiction. 8-10)"
Fourth-grader Julie Dorinsky believes herself a failure, even though she's artistically talented and a whiz at marbles. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BEACH TAIL by Karen Lynn William
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 20, 2010

"Scoop up this tale for its strength as a unique beach story and for its warm portrayal of an African-American son and father enjoying the outdoors. (Picture book. 3-6)"
While Greg and his dad enjoy a beach day, Dad sets two rules: "Don't go in the water / and don't leave Sandy," a lion Greg has drawn in the sand. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAINTED DREAMS by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 1998

"Stock's combines sophistication with childlike strokes of watercolor to give an eye-opening glimpse—as does her note at the end—into the culture of the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. (Picture book. 5-8)"
PLB 0-688-13902-7 Paint scavenged from a garbage pile, bits of red brick and white rocks, and brushes painstakingly made from chicken feathers and goat hairs are the only tools Ti Marie can afford for her works of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TAP-TAP by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 21, 1994

"There's lots of regional flavor in the lively, well- researched watercolors, too, and in occasional French words thrown into the dialogue. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Add this simple story about Haiti to the growing list of high- quality picture books set in the Caribbean (see also Tukama Tootles the Flute by Phillis Gershator, p. 142). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CIRCLES OF HOPE by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2005

"A story of sibling love and responsibility, written without didacticism or sentimentalism. (Picture book. 6-8)"
When Lucía comes into the world, Papa is away working in the city. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GALIMOTO by Karen Lynn Williams
Released: March 21, 1990

"Not only an authentic picture of present-day Africa, this is also an attractive portrayal of self-reliant children who know how to meet their own needs through good-humored bargaining and ingenuity, happily absorbed in imaginative play."
In Malawi, a galimoto is a toy that a child makes from wire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST GRADE KING by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 23, 1992

"As for Joey—he's an indomitable little guy whose enthusiasms and fears are totally on the mark. (Fiction. 5-8)"
Joey King is as ready as any kid on the block to get to class and learn to read; in fact, that's the main reason he's willing to attend school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS SANGOEL by Karen Lynn Williams
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2009

"Though a skinny eight-year-old with downcast eyes, Sangoel is such a picture of quiet dignity that readers will come away admiring his courage and self-possession. (afterword) (Picture book. 7-9)"
The authors of Four Feet, Two Sandals (2007, illustrated by Doug Chayka) craft another sensitively written, hope-filled immigrant story, this one featuring a young Sudanese refugee who finds an inventive way to break the ice in his new American school. Read full book review >