Search Results: "Kate Atkinson"


BOOK REVIEW

KATE by William J. Mann
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 2006

"A sprawling salute to an awe-inspiring, world-class actor."
Film biographer/historian Mann (Edge of Midnight, 2005, etc.) considers the vibrant life of a 20th-century icon with encyclopedic scrutiny and a pinch of whimsy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN WILL THERE BE GOOD NEWS? by Kate Atkinson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 24, 2008

"Like the most riveting BBC mystery, in which understated, deadpan intelligence illuminates characters' inner lives within a convoluted plot."
A third appearance for former police investigator and private detective Jackson Brodie in this psychologically astute thriller from Atkinson (One Good Turn, 2006, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GOD IN RUINS by Kate Atkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 5, 2015

"But do we really have just one life, as Ursula insists? It's a point worth pondering. A grown-up, elegant fairy tale, at least of a kind, with a humane vision of people in all their complicated splendor."
Fresh from the excellent Life After Life (2013), Atkinson takes another sidelong look at the natures of time and reality in this imaginative novel, her ninth.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOT THE END OF THE WORLD by Kate Atkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 3, 2003

"Stories, on balance, that appear above all to love the sound of their own voices."
Twelve debut stories from Whitbread winner Atkinson (Behind the Scenes at the Museum, 1996) are unparalleled in deftness but in their depth less compelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ONE GOOD TURN by Kate Atkinson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 11, 2006

"A technically adept and pleasurable tale, but Atkinson isn't stretching herself."
A murder mystery with comic overtones from the award-winning British storyteller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE MUSEUM by Kate Atkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1996

"With a sly, biting humor and honest warmth, a thoroughly enjoyable first novel with the promise of good things to come."
Spanning generations and both world wars, this British debut leaves no stone unturned in recounting the humorously turbulent family history of Ruby Lennox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CASE HISTORIES by Kate Atkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 9, 2004

"Wonderful fun and very moving: it's a pleasure to see this talented writer back on form."
After two self-indulgent detours, Atkinson proves that her Whitbread Award-winning debut, Behind the Scenes at the Museum (1996), was no fluke with a novel about three interconnected mysteries. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMOTIONALLY WEIRD by Kate Atkinson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Behind the Scenes at the Museum proved Atkinson can be playful and probing when she chooses. Fans of this talented writer can only hope that next time out she'll concentrate more on emotional substance, less on narrative tricks."
The author of Whitbread Award-winner Behind the Scenes at the Museum (1996) indulges in even more of the postmodern game-playing that disrupted Human Croquet (1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATE & PIPPIN by Martin Springett
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 28, 2012

"Again, awwww. (Picture book. 3-6)"
The true story, captured in intimate photos, of an old Great Dane and an abandoned fawn. Awwww. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATE CULHANE by Michael Hague
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2001

"Spectral figures, Gothic hues, and Rackham-esque lines are used very effectively in the watercolor pictures, which are fully as scary as the text. (source note) (Picture book/folktale. 9-12)"
A shivery ghost story from Ireland that will surely appeal to lovers of the macabre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPTAIN KATE by Carolyn Reeder
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 1999

"The real strength of the novel, however, is in the depiction of the complex, tangled relationship that forms between Kate and Seth, and the emotional growth they experience as they struggle to reconcile their feelings about sharing a new family. (Fiction. 10-14)"
Setting her story in the third year of the Civil War, Reeder (Foster's War, p. 61, etc.) writes of a young girl who takes it upon herself to pilot the family's canal boat 184 miles from Cumberland, Maryland to Georgetown. Read full book review >