Search Results: "Katharine Park"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 16, 1998

"An informed and original look at the role of wonder during a time when there was a whole lot to wonder about. (114 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Historians of science Daston (Harvard) and Park's (Max Planck Inst.) sweeping investigation into the place of wonder and wonders in natural philosophy and history—from the High Middle Ages to the Enlightenment—is dense with erudition and pleasingly light on its scholarly feet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIRST SNOW by Bomi Park
by Bomi Park, illustrated by Bomi Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"Readers will find themselves longing for the season's first snow, too. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A little Korean child celebrates the titular first snow. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET’S COUNT THE PUPPIES by Katharine Kunhardt
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 1, 2004

"The crowded counting arena offers more successful choices from a pedagogical standpoint, but lab lovers may consider this a sweet treat. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Plump Labrador retriever puppies are the starring characters in this counting book with a determinedly cheery text and photographs of the appealing dogs from a single puppy waving a paw up to 12 pups posed on a bench. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICK HARTE WAS HERE by Barbara Park
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 20, 1995

"By the end of the book, readers miss him, too. (Fiction. 8-12)"
It's always difficult reading about the death of a child, especially when he's ``one of the neatest kids you'd ever want to meet.'' That's how Phoebe Harte, 13, describes her slightly younger brother Mick, in a poignant story by a writer more associated with making readers laugh (Maxie, Rosie, and Earl—Partners in Grime, 1990, etc.) than cry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIFT OF THE EMPEROR by Therese Park
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"War crimes against women are memorably described here, but, sadly, by characters that seem more like one-dimensional witnesses than vibrantly complex fictional creations."
Newcomer Park offers a graphic but stilted addition to the growing fiction (Nora Okja Keller's Comfort Woman, p. 161; Paul West's The Tent of Orange Mist, 1995, etc.) about Japanese exploitation of thousands of Asian women during WW II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERSONAL DAYS by Ed Park
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 20, 2008

"Kind of like if Office Space ended with scenes from the Kevin Costner vehicle Mr. Brooks."
An entertaining, if slightly disappointing, debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HIDDEN WORLD by Paul Park
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2008

"What we end up with is not so much an unreliable narrator as an unreliable viewpoint, and there's far too much going on for most readers to sort out. Still, fans of the previous volumes won't be disappointed."
Fourth and final installment of Park's fantasy (The White Tyger, 2007, etc.) set in an alternate world where Roumania battles Turkey in the trenches of an otherworldly World War One. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLOUDS by Katharine Hall
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 10, 2014

"Rather than this one-size-fits-none book, choose one that suits the age and developmental level of a specific intended audience. (Nonfiction. 4-7)"
Hall continues her Compare and Contrast series (Polar Bears and Penguins, 2014) with a brief look at the many ways clouds are different from one another. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THOUSANDTH FLOOR by Katharine McGee
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 30, 2016

"Individual elements are appealing, but sometimes the novel feels like an awfully long setup for a sequel. (Dystopian romance. 14-18)"
Five teens experience emotional ruin resulting from the rigid socio-economic caste system that rules their futuristic vertical city—a 1,000-story residential/retail tower—in the year 2118. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DAZZLING HEIGHTS by Katharine McGee
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Aug. 29, 2017

"Only for avid CW viewers and tabloid-news fans, a shallow yet overlong tale of rich people and their problems. (Dystopian romance. 14-18)"
Guilty parties continue to party in this soap-opera sequel. Read full book review >