Search Results: "Katherine Lee Bates"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2013

"Handsomely designed, this is a beautiful tribute to America and Americana. (selected national landmarks and symbols, biographical note, song lyrics, definition of democracy) (Picture book. 5-9)"
What better way to make this patriotic song meaningful to kids than with these lively illustrations by 10 different illustrators? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL by Katherine Lee Bates
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"Pair this uplifting debut with Barbara Younger's Purple Mountain Majesties, illustrated by Stacey Schuett (1998), which focuses on the poem's composer. (introduction) (Picture book/poem. 6-10)"
Gall, an actual descendant of Bates, illustrates the four verses of this country's other national anthem with bold, clean-lined, heroic American scenes, from a sturdy rural couple contemplating their "amber waves," to firefighters raising a flag over the ruins at Ground Zero. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

From Dust to Dust and a Lifetime in Between by Katherine Anne Lee
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 24, 2013

"A well-told story of one woman's life, with appealing supernatural undercurrents."
Lee, in herdebut novel, fictionalizes the story of her English grandmother's life. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

KATHERINE ARDEN
by Rachel Sugar

From its very first pages, you’d have no idea that Katherine Arden’s sweeping historical fantasy is the author’s first novel. And you could be forgiven for expressing your shock (or envy or frustration) when you find out that in fact the wholly absorbing epic, rooted in Russian folklore, steeped in medieval Russian history, in fact began on a private whim ...


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BOOK REVIEW

ALL BY MYSELF by Ivan Bates
Released: Feb. 29, 2000

BOOK REVIEW

COLD COMFORT by Quentin Bates
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 10, 2012

"More routine than Gunna's debut (Frozen Assets, 2011), but still required reading for anyone who wants a sense of how calamitous Iceland's meltdown was—and what just might be in store for American police procedurals next."
Iceland's financial crisis claims new casualties in venues considerably more homely than banks and corporate offices. Read full book review >

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SOME SUNNY READING FOR A STRANGE SPRING
by Bobbi Dumas

Is spring a little wiggy for you this year? In Wisconsin, it really can’t figure out what it wants to do. A week or so ago it was a sunny eighty degrees and now it’s cool and rainy, hovering around fifty. Thankfully there are so many bright books releasing these days that we can find sun in their pages, if ...


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BOOK REVIEW

THE HIDE-AND-SCARE BEAR by Ivan Bates
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 22, 2016

"Though a bit pat, the book addresses an important social skill for the very young. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A rambunctious bear thinks it is fun to scare all the other animals. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

THE SECRET'S OUT
by Leila Roy

While there’s no explicit rule against romantic relationships, our colonial ancestor jinxed them in her Last Word: “Beware ye aromateur; lay your traps of love, but do not yourself get caught.” Fall in love and, like Aunt Bryony, lose your supersniffer. It’s why Mother chose my father from a list of donors she got in the mail like a ...

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BOOK REVIEW

BIG TRUCK AND LITTLE TRUCK by Jan Carr
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"The characters, situations, and art hark back to an antique picture-book tradition, but children of any generation will understand Little Truck's feelings. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A small pick-up truck suffers separation anxiety in this tale for fans of Little Toot, Katy, and other animated work machines. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEY THERE, OWLFACE by Betty Bates
ANIMALS
Released: June 15, 1991

"Still, an easily read story with appealing b&w illustrations and some solid values. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Brad, who lives with his widowed mother on Gramps's midwestern farm, does some significant maturing during the months he observes a pair of barn owls raise their young. Read full book review >