Search Results: "Katherine S. Newman"


BOOK REVIEW

Katherine by Lorin Hayes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2015

"Possesses the prerequisites for a solid mystery, but the protagonists are the true gems."
A psychiatrist and an attorney help a schizophrenic woman institutionalized for murder whose family seems suspiciously indifferent to her potential release in Hayes' debut thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 12, 1993

"Rambling oral history without much at the core."
Columbia anthropologist Newman (Falling from Grace, 1988) fords the Hudson River and discovers suburbia—as well as a shrieking discontent that will surprise few. ``In the decades that followed the Great Depression,'' according to Newman, ``Americans came to assume that prosperity was their birthright....The economic realities of the 1980s and 1990s have crushed these expectations.'' The younger residents of Pleasanton, New Jersey, have known this for some time: Despite their college educations and tenacious work habits, they are unable to give their children many of the advantages—large homes, full- time mothers, good schools—that they received as a matter of course from their own, far less privileged, parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 17, 2012

"Clear presentation of a growing problem, its causes and consequences and the choices societies make."
A look at the impact of globalization on young people finds intriguing differences in family relationships and living patterns in selected countries around the around. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATHERINE by Anchee Min
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"Lyrical prose with a distinct Chinese flavor makes Min's first novel—and its times—even more poignant and resonant."
From the author of last year's Red Azalea—a highly praised memoir of growing up during the Cultural Revolution—comes a bittersweet story as much about love as about the malignant legacy of Maoist China. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2003

"A well-documented portrait of a little-examined group."
Newman, who studied the working poor in No Shame in My Game (1999), turns her attention to aging in the inner city. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1999

"This is a work of major importance that policymakers and concerned citizens should read, need to read."
Harvard anthropologist Newman (Declining Fortunes: The Withering of the American Dream, 1993, etc.) authors a pathbreaking study of a neglected group of Americans: those who work yet remain mired in poverty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 19, 2016

"A top-notch, highly accessible contribution to the business and popular economics literature."
Now that the tide of outsourcing employment has begun to turn, the time has come to think about how to reverse chronic unemployment among youth in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The many fragmented individual stories tend to blur together, but the message comes through loud and clear."
The lives of nine families just barely scraping by in four New York City neighborhoods. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"The many fragmented individual stories tend to blur together, but the message comes through loud and clear."
The lives of nine families just barely scraping by in four New York City neighborhoods. Read full book review >