Search Results: "Kathleen Van Cleve"


BOOK REVIEW

DRIZZLE by Kathleen Van Cleve
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2010

"Despite references to genetics, laboratory research and classroom-science experiments, the novel ignores fundamentals of the natural world—chief among them, the interconnected and vulnerable web of life. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Narrating this rambling fantasy is 11-year-old Polly Peabody, whose family owns a magical rhubarb (chocolate and medicinal varieties) farm, open to the public with a lake, umbrella ride and other attractions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Krazy Kathleen by William Tellem
Released: Feb. 10, 2016

"A lighthearted ode to books featuring eye-catching, funny pictures of an eccentric character."
A children's librarian who keeps everything in seemingly random piles teaches local residents a lesson in this tale by Tellem (Zen the Zebra, 2015, etc.), featuring illustrations by Coules. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Van Ripplewink by Paul Clayton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 8, 2016

"A serious novel with an amusing premise."
Clayton (In the Shape of a Man, 2013, etc.) updates the story of Rip Van Winkle in this social novel.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN JOHNSON by Ronald L. Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"A perfectly pleasant double feature."
The Van Johnson Story. Starring . . . Van Johnson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN MORRISON by Johnny Rogan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2006

"Sprightly despite its amplitude, a narrative of propulsive drive that is also a reflective, associative piece of social history."
Nearly breath-by-breath biography of the influential Irish musician who has made a dent in rock, blues, folk, country and jazz. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KATHLEEN, PLEASE COME HOME by Scott O'Dell
FICTION
Released: March 1, 1978

"Of course this sort of material has an enduring fascination for daydreaming stay-at-homes."
The diary of a runaway girl, whose dismal experiences are attributed largely to "going along" with a bad companion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN GOGH by Steven Naifeh
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 18, 2011

"Despite its exhaustive length, the book is brilliantly written and engaging, presenting a three-dimensional and larger-than-life portrait of the artist."
A gripping and almost certainly definitive account of the all-too-short life of a great artist who believed he was doomed to oblivion. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN CLIBURN by Howard Reich
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 15, 1993

"Prospective Cliburnites are better advised to invest in the CD re-release of his legendary performances of Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto and Rachmaninoff's second. (Illustrations—16 pp. color & b&w—not seen) (First printing of 35,000)"
The noted American pianist receives an overlong popular biography, stuffed with irritating detail on virtually every page. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VAN by Roddy Doyle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1992

"Vintage Doyle."
A beaten-up van dispensing fish and chips, not some clearing in the deep woods, is the setting for Doyle's warm, humorous, and cleareyed look at male friendship—in this his third book featuring the irrepressible Rabbitte family of Dublin (The Commitments, 1989; The Snapper, see above). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE VAN by John Ball
Released: March 22, 1989

Ball's final novel (he died last October) is a sorry testament: neither is it one of his popular Virgil Tibbs mysteries (In the Heat of the Night, etc.) nor an addition to his Jack Tallon series, but a lumbering police procedural—loosely based on a real L.A. serial-killer case—saved from amateurism only by tight attention to cop-detail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOLF IN WHITE VAN by John Darnielle
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 2014

"A pop culture-infused novel that thoughtfully and nonjudgmentally considers the dark side of nerddom."
A man badly disfigured in a gun accident ponders gaming, heavy metal, family, love and the crazed emotions that tend to surround our obsessions. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VAN GOGH'S BAD CAFê by Frederic Tuten
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 1, 1997

"The New York scene, though, is far less compelling, leaving a mismatch in intensity that's hard to overlook, no matter how much one might want to."
Again blurring the lines between past and present, fact and fancy, Tuten (Tintin in the New World, 1993, etc.) reconfigures his familiar theme of love's totemic urgency, here pitting the needs of Vincent van Gogh against those of a late-20th-century rival in Manhattan's East Village. Read full book review >