Search Results: "Kathryn Davis"


BOOK REVIEW

DUPLEX by Kathryn Davis
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"More fiction than science fiction, admirably written but not for the average reader of the genre, this book will please and surprise."
Literate science fiction, its deadpan tone controlled, which examines life in a future that may or may not be dystopian. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HELL by Kathryn Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 26, 1998

Davis's third (The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, 1993) is a tour de force made up of the surreal and the poetic, of skillful shifts in voices, settings, and eras—but, under the pyrotechnics, with a nagging sense of there being primarily the familiar and well trodden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIRL WHO TROD ON A LOAF by Kathryn Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 5, 1993

"Artifice and reality clash, then merge, in this strange and visionary novel."
Davis's second novel is as lyrically intense as Labrador (1988) and is also set in a cold, remote landscape—heightening the operatic passions of this dense, fabulistic invention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE THIN PLACE by Kathryn Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 26, 2006

"A delightful, surprise-filled narrative: Davis's best yet."
Metamorphosis, resurrection and the mysterious ways in which all living things are connected are the themes of Davis's homespun magical-realist sixth novel (Versailles, 2002, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VERSAILLES by Kathryn Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 8, 2002

"Thoroughly researched, carefully composed—yet psychologically inert and unalive."
The lyric gifts familiar from Davis (The Walking Tour, 1999, etc.) are on display again in this fictional life of Marie Antoinette—but technique rushes in as emotion goes into hiding. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WALKING TOUR by Kathryn Davis
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 8, 1999

"A complex, tightly packed, ambitious work, by one of the most thoroughly original (and valuable) of contemporary writers. (Author tour)"
Davis, who seems equal parts Jane Austen and Isak Dinesen, offers a somber fable of longing, frustrated love, and guilt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOMEWHERE LIES THE MOON by Kathryn Lynn Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1999

"Davis writes romances for those, d—ya ken, who like to read about hidden spirits, exchange long, sensitive hugs, and talk about their feelings endlessly."
Another volume in Davis's wordy epic of women bonding in a Scottish glen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL WE HOLD DEAR by Kathryn Lynn Davis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1995

"A grand mystical romance—though Davis (Sing to Me of Dreams, 1990, etc.) nearly suffocates her narrative in a Scottish bog of overwriting."
In this sequel to Too Deep for Tears (1989), a modern-day Scottish heroine searches for her heritage in the diary of a 19th- century ancestor. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WAR DOGS by Kathryn Selbert
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2013

"The combination of thoughtful design, compelling illustrations and a winsome canine companion make this beginning biography stand out. (timeline, afterword, bibliography) (Informational picture book. 6-12)"
An introductory look at Winston Churchill and his notable place in British history uses a clever narrative device that focuses on his miniature poodle, Rufus. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DRAW THE LINE by Kathryn  Otoshi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"A simple, beautiful concept whose reach grows with each rereading. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A wordless musing on the nature of disagreements and friendship. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

BEST BOOKS OF 2016: ANDREA DAVIS PINKNEY
by Poornima Apte

Long before “We Need Diverse Books” gained momentum as a movement towards inclusivity in children’s literature, writer and illustrator Ezra Jack Keats made history. Peter, the star of his groundbreaking picture book, The Snowy Day, was black.

Children’s book author Andrea Davis Pinkney reminds us what a big deal this was in 1962 when the book was first published. The ...


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