Search Results: "Kathryn H. Kidd"


BOOK REVIEW

LOVELOCK by Orson Scott Card
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 1, 1994

"What really annoys is that, without even a token ending here, this isn't the beginning of a trilogy at all, but the arbitrary opening chunk of a bloated and flabby single yarn."
The first volume of a planned trilogy from Card (The Ships of Earth, 1994, etc.) and hardcover debutante Kidd is set on a huge starship, or Ark, soon to depart from Earth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

$2.00 A DAY by Kathryn J. Edin
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"An eye-opening account of the lives ensnared in the new poverty cycle."
An analysis of the growing portion of American poor who live on an average of $2 per day. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAMMY CARDUCCI'S GUIDE TO WOMEN by Ronald Kidd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 1991

"Readers who enjoy comedies of embarrassment will laugh through this while absorbing the author's suggestion that they needn't rush to maturity. (Fiction. 11-14)"
An antic, lightweight tale about suburban sixth-graders in pursuit of the opposite sex. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DREAMBENDER by Ronald Kidd
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2016

"There are plenty of novels about kindly-but-oppressive dystopian societies in which a child has a designated future path; skip this one. (Fantasy. 10-13)"
It is a truth universally acknowledged that a society in which 13-year-olds are assigned careers must be in want of a savior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHEESE MONKEYS by Chip Kidd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 16, 2001

". . . suck brains with a genius who really is a genius: that is, when you Read This Book."
Sheer charm <\b>most of the way in debut fiction by acclaimed book-cover artist Kidd, associate director of jackets at Knopf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE YEAR OF THE BOMB by Ronald Kidd
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 9, 2009

"He also gives Paul plenty of food for thought about the hazards of rushing to judgment, of taking people at face value and, most profoundly, of living in a pervasive climate of fear—all decidedly relevant topics for today's readers to mull, too. (Historical fiction. 11-13)"
Ever-so-aptly billed "Stand By Me meets Invasion of the Body Snatchers," this multilayered historical novel features a quartet of quarrelsome—but loyal in the crunch—13-year-olds responding to the anxieties of the McCarthy-era Cold War. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROOM OF SHADOWS by Ronald Kidd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2017

"An introduction that might tempt readers to explore Poe's own nightmares. (Fantasy. 9-13)"
What kind of horror might Edgar Allan Poe perpetrate in today's world? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEARNERS by Chip Kidd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 18, 2008

"Whimsical, at times bordering on fey, but also keen-edged and original."
Graphic designer Kidd (The Cheese Monkeys, 2001) writes a novel about a graphic designer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIMSELF by Jess Kidd
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 21, 2017

"A darkly comic tale that is skillfully and lyrically told."
Lovable car thief and Dublin charmer Mahony had always been told he was left on the steps of an orphanage as a baby. But a deathbed confession reveals that there might be more to the story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NIGHT ON FIRE by Ronald Kidd
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Beautifully written and earnestly delivered, the novel rolls to an inexorable, stunning conclusion readers won't soon forget. (Historical fiction. 9-13)"
In 1961, riding a Greyhound bus was more than a way to get from one place to another. For some, the destination was freedom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A competent, useful volume on a vital topic. (b&w photos, diagrams, index, not seen, glossary, further reading) (Nonfiction. 11-15)"
``Green is the color of cultivated fields and the untouched wilderness,'' the Kidds begin, amplifying that observation with an intelligent discussion of the attendant issues that roil in the background. Read full book review >