Search Results: "Kathryn Miles"


BOOK REVIEW

QUAKELAND by Kathryn Miles
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 29, 2017

"Occasionally long-winded but readable and engaging—not to mention eye-opening, as the author delivers a firm warning to policymakers as well as individual citizens."
A wide-ranging account of earthquakes, the least understood of natural disasters, with vivid stories of the havoc they create and a warning about what will someday happen in the United States. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUPERSTORM by Kathryn Miles
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"A rogue storm dazzlingly caught in all its unprecedented bizarreness."
The strange and devastating life of Hurricane Sandy receives a fine, grim telling from Miles (English/Chatham Univ.; All Standing: The Remarkable Story of the Jeanie Johnston, The Legendary Irish Famine Ship, 2013, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 8, 2013

"The author's solid research and use of newly available material exposes the truth of the Potato Famine, the barbaric policies that exacerbated it and the incredible will of the Irish people."
Miles (Environmental Writing/Unity Coll.) builds her story around the Jeanie Johnston, the only ship fleeing the Irish Potato Famine with a 100 percent survival rate in its many Atlantic crossings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WANT NOT by Jonathan Miles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 2013

"For readers who relish extravagant language, scathing wit and philosophical heft, this book wastes nothing."
Miles' panoramic second novel (Dear American Airlines, 2008) is structured around differing definitions of waste. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHEROKEE ROSE by Tiya Miles
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 7, 2015

"An enchanting examination of bloodlines, legacy and the myriad branches of a diverse family tree."
A buried, early-19th-century diary, the fragrance of wild white roses and the rustling of river-cane reeds bring to life this refreshing debut novel by Miles, a winner of a MacArthur Fellowship (American Culture/Univ. of Michigan; The House on Diamond Hill, 2010, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A sweeping debut not only for the author but also for this branch of American poli-sci, with color on every page and a hacker's gift for cutting through the blather."
The chronicle of a farcically troubled marriage between two rich, hubristic West Coast techies and their e-mail-challenged D.C. counterparts. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOD by Jack Miles
NON-FICTION
Released: April 14, 1995

"A flawed but able telling of a story that's not easy to comprehend, much less articulate. (First printing of 35,000; Book-of-the-Month Club/Quality Paperback Book Club selections; author tour)"
This learned and insightful approach to talking about God is a theological education in itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 8, 2000

"Harvey stretches some analogies to the snapping point, but has drawn a lovely map of an exotic world. (18 maps, not seen)"
Magazine journalist Harvey (Outside) charts the case of Gilbert Bland Jr., who in the 1990s stole vast amounts of rare material from some of North America's most prestigious research libraries and thus became "the greatest American map thief in history." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Engaging and fun to read, but for a more subtle study, see Myraim Miedzian's Boys Will Be Boys (p. 587)."
The lurid title suits this swift, wry, anecdotal survey of the pitiful confusion that Miles (The Women's History of the World, 1989; Women and Power, 1986) finds in the lives of adult men: Acculturated largely by women to identify with their penises (which makes them prone to violence), they are, she says, ``dislocated'' by the women's movement, frustrated, angry, and even more violent than historically they have been known to be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TENOCLOCK SCHOLAR by John Miles
Released: Jan. 8, 1996

"A chamber mystery that can't help looking kind of puny amid the wide open spaces."
Miles, who published Missing at Tenoclock (1994) under the pseudonym Arthur Williams, unmasks himself for this sequel. Read full book review >