Search Results: "Katie Smith Milway"


BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2012

"Readers will take much away from this, including an appreciation for their health-care resources and a desire to make a difference in the world. (map, glossary) (Picture book. 6-10)"
This entry in the CitizenKid series successfully conveys to readers both the importance of health care/disease prevention and the limited availability of these in the third world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Endnotes add information about food security around the world and include a glossary of Spanish words. (Picture book. 7-10)"
When the exhausted soil of their family plot doesn't yield enough and her father leaves to find work, María Luz plants the winter vegetables using new farming techniques she learns from her teacher, Don Pedro. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2008

"The author introduces the real Kojo at the end as well as some of the international organizations that make these life-changing bootstrap loans. (Picture book. 8-10)"
Loosely based on an actual success story, this tale of a Ghanaian lad who parlays one hen into a major poultry farm highlights the way microloans are helping to break the cycle of poverty in many third-world communities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BANANA-LEAF BALL by Katie Smith Milway
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"This outside-looking-in depiction of the power of play to bridge new relationships in Burundi serves as a universal lesson that all readers can draw on. (Picture book. 7-11)"
In this heartwarming tale, readers take a trip to the refugee camps of Tanzania to see how play can transform fear, conflict, and distrust into empathy, tolerance, and teamwork. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMITH by Leon Garfield
Released: Sept. 1, 1967

"More Hogarth than Cruikshank, this lacks the gusto of Devil in the Fog (1966) but readers who respond to the author will follow him here."
"Smith. 'unted, 'ounded, 'omeless, and part gin-sodder. Smith. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CAPPUCCINA GOES TO TOWN by Mary Ann Smith
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2001

"Tossing her head in a friendly way, she stepped over to the dressmaker's') and in the artwork, all tropical colors and enough enormous grins on each page to make your teeth ache. (Picture book. 5-8)"
It's a cow's life, until Cappuccina gets it in her head that town looks a lot more fun than her pasture, in this candied grass-is-greener tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLYAWAY KATIE by Polly Dunbar
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2004

"Exuberant, to say the least. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A joyous cure for a case of the doldrums. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAGGIE SMITH by Michael Coveney
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 29, 2015

"An authoritative and perceptive portrait."
The illustrious career of "a great stage actress in both comedy and tragedy, and an international film star." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CINDERELLA SMITH by Stephanie Barden
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 24, 2011

"Though the first-person narration sounds a little too close to the voice of Sara Pennypacker's Clementine, the richness of this new friendship and the gentle resolution will make readers hope for another installment. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Cinderella Smith cannot keep track of her shoes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOSEPH SMITH by Richard Lyman Bushman
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2005

"More complete but less evenhanded than Robert Remini's Joseph Smith (2002); some readers may find parts of Bushman's narrative to be overly credulous."
Orthodox life of the decidedly unorthodox Joseph Smith, founder and prophet of Mormonism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STEVIE SMITH by Frances Spalding
Released: May 29, 1989

From the author of Vanessa Bell: A Bloomsbury Portrait (1983), a comprehensive look at the life and literary work of Stevie Smith (1902-1971)—whose unorthodox, sometimes humorous, deceptively deep poetry won her acclaim throughout England and entree into intellectual society even as she continued to work as a secretary and live in an unfashionable London suburb. Read full book review >