Search Results: "Kenneth S. Davis"


BOOK REVIEW

FDR by Kenneth S. Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1993

"The means by which all this occurred are not explained here."
Fourth and below-par volume of Davis's ongoing biography of FDR (1986, etc.), this entry covering 1936-40. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON'T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THE AMERICAN PRESIDENTS by Kenneth C. Davis
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 11, 2012

"The tedious format only occasionally dulls the author's sharp descriptive and analytical skills."
The author of Don't Know Much About History and similar titles returns with a sometimes-saucy handbook on the American presidency. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"An accessible and informed guide to an always-fascinating subject, and an ideal reference for the general reader."
The latest addition to the Don't Know Much About series (Don't Know Much About History, 2003, etc.) is an engaging handbook on gods, goddesses and the civilizations they have inspired. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 11, 2010

"Mostly engaging but rarely edifying."
Don't Know Much About® series creator Davis (America's Hidden History, 2008, etc.) examines six little-known episodes that influenced American history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHARLIE CHAPLIN AND HIS TIMES by Kenneth S. Lynn
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1997

"While this biography isn't as detailed or thorough as some (for example, Lynn slides over Chaplin's tax troubles in a few sentences), it has all the pacing, sense of character, and narrative verve of a good novel. (24 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
An accomplished and highly readable contribution to the recent wave of revisionist Chaplin biographies (such as Joyce Milton's Tramp, 1996). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 20, 2016

"An important and timely corrective. (timelines, source notes, bibliography, index). (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
Known for his Don't Know Much About… series, Davis here focuses on the lives of five individuals who were enslaved to some of the most important proponents of American liberty; "Only then can we really understand and possibly move past the stain of a racist past that still haunts America." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 9, 2005

"A timely, compelling argument that should make owners of hybrid cars just a little bit happier, and everyone else very glum indeed."
The world is running on empty, warns petroleum geologist Deffeyes (Hubbert's Peak, 2001), and yet Humvees continue to roll down the assembly lines, roads to be built, and economic models to be churned out. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 10, 1996

This is an alarming record of the rapid growth since 1994 of the militia movement in this country—the movement that, as Stern shows, nurtured the radical anti-government ideology shared by Timothy McVeigh, accused of bombing the federal building in Oklahoma City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DON’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT THE 50 STATES by Kenneth C. Davis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2001

"Because Davis's accuracy is sometimes as casual as his style—not all of the Alamo's defenders were Texans, for instance, and Davy Crockett wore a coonskin cap far more often in legend than in life—it's not a primary purchase for libraries. (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-10)"
The author of the popular adult Don't Know Much About series goes after a younger audience, laying out a skimpy assortment of random facts about the states and using the same lighthearted Q&A format. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CURSE OF CASH by Kenneth S. Rogoff
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2016

"Money geeks are the primary audience, to be sure, but futurists and trend-watchers will also take interest in the author's proposals for phasing out cash."
A noted economist imagines a modern society that functions without paper money and coins. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2012

"A taut, intelligent analysis of a dramatic turning point in South African and, indeed, world history."
A law professor revisits the trial that "saved…the very soul" of South Africa. Read full book review >