Search Results: "Kenneth S. Greenberg"


BOOK REVIEW

HONOR AND SLAVERY by Kenneth S. Greenberg
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1996

"Charged with ideas, this is a cheerfully speculative and valuable addition to the library of the Civil War."
A piercing—and decidedly offbeat—look into the mind of the Old South. ``This book,'' writes historian Greenberg, ``is a work of translation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANK GREENBERG by Hank Greenberg
Released: May 24, 1989

Flatfooted, posthumous autobiography by the great Detroit Tigers slugger of the 1930's and 1940's, edited after his death by Ira Berkow (Red—A Biography of Red Smith, Carew, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by J.J. Abrams
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 29, 2013

"Beguiling. For fans of mysteries, postmodern fiction and fine bookmaking: a book that makes demands of its reader, but that amply entertains in return."
A delightful, endlessly unfolding fiction that is meta beyond meta, a sort of Da Vinci Code for smart people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S. by Slavenka Drakulic
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2000

"This one is more painful than most."
Justly acclaimed as a journalist and an essayist, Drakuli—chose the novel for her latest tale of the terrors of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

S by John Updike
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 12, 1988

"Possible moral here: a rage for symmetry isn't always an artist's best friend."
A companion piece to Roger's Version, this is Updike updating Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter by having Hester Prynne—here, Sarah Worth—get her two cents in as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CLEMENT GREENBERG by Florence Rubenfeld
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 1, 1998

"A clear and honest summary of the life of one of the most pugnacious, influential, and original critics of modern art. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
A sympathetic biography of the controversial critic who championed the abstract expressionist school as early as 1944, when he anointed Jackson Pollock and a few others as the ``future of American painting.'' The bristly Greenberg, who died in 1994, began writing literary and art criticism and essays in the '30s, while working for the US Customs Service in New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAT TURNER by Kenneth Greenberg
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 20, 2003

"An illuminating stew of antebellum Southern history, ethnic relations, and contemporary social literature."
The famed leader of a 19th-century slave uprising and his now largely forgotten followers come up for scholarly reappraisal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HANK GREENBERG by John Rosengren
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 5, 2013

"A sensitive look at the cultural impact of the man who once was 'the face of Judaism in America.'"
A veteran sportswriter fondly recalls the life of "the greatest Jewish ballplayer of all time." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISS-S-S-S! by Eric A. Kimmel
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"With a disappointing lack of emotion and humor, the story feels less like a boy's adventure with his first pet and more like a manual on how to (and how not to) care for a pet snake. (Fiction. 7-12)"
Ophidiophobes beware! Readers who aren't genuine snake lovers will likely find it difficult to sink their fangs into this tale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"The result is a multilayered portrait of a man who was content being remembered as a great Jewish ballplayer. (source notes, bibliography, resources) (Biography. 10-14)"
Hank Greenberg was an anomaly who challenged the stereotypes of his era. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KENNETH CLARK by James Stourton
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2016

"A sparkling, thoroughly entertaining portrait of a brilliant popularizer who brought art to the masses."
The man who wanted to civilize us all. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KENNETH GRAHAME’S THE RELUCTANT DRAGON by Robert D. San Souci
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2004

"The story's theme of finding alternatives to violence always merits revisiting, but the original, however wordy it may seem by current standards, still makes a far richer reading experience. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Widely spaced lines of elegant type evoke the witty tone of Grahame's classic, unlike either this stripped-down version of the text, or the accompanying small, childlike watercolors. Read full book review >